Women's experiences of their maternity care: A principle- based concept analysis

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dc.contributor.author Beecher, Claire
dc.contributor.author Devane, Declan
dc.contributor.author White, Mark
dc.contributor.author Greene, Richard
dc.contributor.author Dowling, Maura
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-10T10:24:04Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-10T10:24:04Z
dc.date.issued 2019-11-18
dc.identifier.citation Beecher, C., Devane, D., White, M., Greene, R. and Dowling, M. (2019) 'Women’s experiences of their maternity care: A principle- based concept analysis', Women and Birth. doi: 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.11.001 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 7 en
dc.identifier.issn 1871-5192
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9371
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.11.001 en
dc.description.abstract Background: Despite many countries employing the use of national and large scale regional surveys to explore women’s experiences of their maternity care, with the results informing national maternity policy and practice, the concept itself is ambiguous and ill-defined having not been subject of a structured concept development endeavour. Aim: The aim of this review is to report on an in-depth analysis conducted on the concept of ‘women’s experiences of their maternity care’. Methods: Using the principle-based method of concept analysis by Penrod and Hupcey (2005), the concept of ‘women’s experiences of their maternity care’ was analysed under the epistemological, pragmatic, linguistic and logical principles. The final dataset included 87 items of literature published between 1990 and 2017 retrieved from a systematic search of the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and PSYCinfo databases. Findings: The epistemological principle identified that a theoretical definition of the concept is elusive with a variety of implicit meanings. The pragmatic principle supports the utility of the concept in scientific literature, however the lack of a theoretical definition has led to inconsistent use of the concept, as highlighted by the linguistic principle. Furthermore, the logical principle highlighted that as the concept lacks definition blurring is identifiable when theoretically positioned with related concepts. Conclusion: The outcome of this concept analysis is a theoretical definition of a previously undefined concept. This definition highlights the subjective nature of the concept, its dependency upon a woman’s individual needs, expectations and circumstances and the influence of the organisation and delivery of maternity care. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.rights © 2019, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Midwives. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Experiences of care en
dc.subject Maternity care en
dc.subject Midwifery en
dc.subject Nursing en
dc.subject Concept analysis en
dc.title Women's experiences of their maternity care: A principle- based concept analysis en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Richard Greene, Department Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:r.greene@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Service Executive, Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Women and Birth en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress r.greene@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck Check, vol, issue and article ID en
dc.identifier.eissn 1878-1799


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© 2019, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Midwives. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Midwives. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
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