Sediment transport modelling and geomorphological assessments related to offshore renewable energy developments in the Irish Sea

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Files
Date
2022
Authors
Creane, Shauna
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
University College Cork
Published Version
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Abstract
A combination of in-situ geophysical, geological and oceanographic datasets, and advanced numerical modelling tools are used to: improve the understanding of hydrodynamics and morphodynamics in the Irish Sea, develop new methods and approaches to investigate hydrodynamics and seabed morphodynamics in an offshore setting, collect and produce novel datasets that will contribute to this scientific field, and facilitate the sustainable growth of anthropogenic activities in the Irish Sea. These new methods and approaches include, using process-based indicators to understand sediment wave development and distribution, utilising ADCP-based suspended solids concentration as a numerical model calibration tool, and the application of a ‘sediment budget’ to an offshore sand bank to understand external influences on the stability of its morphodynamic system. Results provide hydrodynamic proof underpinning the presence of the bed load parting (BLP) in central Irish Sea and associated divergent sediment transport pathways driving sediment dispersal across this tidally-dominated continental shelf sea. Analysis of tidal propagation through the Irish Sea Basin concludes that the origin of the BLP is mainly attributed to the intersection of the north and south tidal fronts at an inclined angle due to Coriolis Forcing and coastline interactions. Minor factors impacting the shape and location of the BLP are the change in tidal character at (a) abrupt bathymetry changes, (b) headlands and intricate coastline topography, and (c) large-scale constrictions. These outcomes set the basis of understanding for the thesis. Building upon this knowledge, analysis of targeted, high resolution, time-lapse bathymetry datasets in the south-western Irish Sea reveals sediment waves in a range of sizes (height = 0.1 to 25.7 m, and wavelength = 17 to 983 m), occurring in water depths of 8.2 to 83 mLAT, and migrating at a rate of 1.1 to 79 m/yr. Combined with numerical modelling outputs, a strong divergence of sediment transport pathways from the previously understood predominantly southward flow in the south Irish Sea is revealed. Furthermore, a new source and sink mechanism are defined for offshore independent sediment wave assemblages, whereby each sediment wave field is supported by circulatory residual current cells originating from offshore sand banks. Reliable sediment transport modelling is required to investigate these physical processes further, therefore, the need for cost-effective sediment validation datasets for 2D sediment transport models is addressed, utilising ADCP-based datasets. A robust spatial timeseries of ADCP-based suspended solids concentration was successfully calculated in an offshore, tidally-dominated setting. Three new validation techniques are deemed advantageous in developing an accurate 2D suspended sediment transport, including i) validation of 2D modelled suspended sediment concentration using water sample-based suspended solids concentration, ii) validation of the flood-ebb characteristics of 2D modelled suspended load transport and suspended sediment concentration using ADCP-based datasets and iii) validation of the 2D modelled peak suspended sediment concentration over a spring-neap cycle using the ADCP-based suspended solids concentration. The robust coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport model produced from this research is used as a tool of investigation in subsequent chapters. The complex hydrodynamic processes controlling upper slope mobility and long-term base stability of Arklow Bank are determined. Results reveal a flood and ebb tidal current dominance on the west and east side of the bank respectively, ultimately generating a large anticlockwise residual current eddy encompassing the entire bank. The positioning of multiple off-bank anticlockwise residual current eddies on the edge of this cell is shown to both facilitate and inhibit east-west fluctuations of the upper slopes of the bank and control long-term bank base stability. Within Arklow Bank’s morphological cell, eight morphodynamically and hydrodynamically unique bank sections or ‘sub-cells’ are identified, whereby a complex morphodynamic-hydrodynamic feedback loop is present. The local east-west fluctuation of the upper slopes of the bank is driven by migratory on-bank stationary and transient clockwise residual eddies and the development of ‘narrow’ residual current cross-flow zones. Together these processes drive upper slope mobility but maintain long term bank base stability. A sediment budget was successfully estimated for an offshore linear sand bank, Arklow Bank, whereby seven source and nine sink pathways are identified. The restriction of sediment sources off the southern extent of Arklow Bank impact erosion and accretion patterns in the mid and northern sections of the bank after just one lunar month simulation. Where tidal current is the primary driver of sand bank morphodynamics, wind- and wave-induced flow is shown to alter sediment distribution patterns. This advanced body of work forms a robust scientific evidence-base to facilitate the sustainable growth of offshore renewable developments.
Description
Keywords
Hydrodynamics , Morphodynamics , Offshore renewable energy , Sediment transport
Citation
Creane, S. 2022. Sediment transport modelling and geomorphological assessments related to offshore renewable energy developments in the Irish Sea. PhD Thesis, University College Cork.