Investigating the antecedents of perceived threats and user resistance to health information technology: a case study of a public hospital

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Date
2020-02-24
Authors
Alohali, Mansor
Carton, Fergal
O'Connor, Yvonne
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Taylor & Francis Group
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Abstract
Health information technology (HIT) can improve the quality of healthcare, but improvements are likely to be hindered if physicians and nurses resist HIT. In response, this study investigates the antecedents of the perceived threats to HIT and user resistance by examining the organisational factors, the personal traits of users, HIT-related factors, and the factors related to the interaction between physicians, nurses, and the organisation. By building on an in-depth case study of a public hospital, the study develops a conceptual model. The main findings of the study suggest that perceived dissatisfaction and loss of professional autonomy are the main perceived threats of HIT for physicians and nurses. Furthermore, five factors that influence these perceptions are identified, and they include related knowledge, management support, user involvement, system performance, and social influences. The study will ensure a better understanding of the phenomenon, as it will contribute to identifying the core reasons for resistance.
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Keywords
User resistance , Health information technology , Perceived threats
Citation
Alohali, M., Carton, F. and O’Connor, Y. (2020) 'Investigating the antecedents of perceived threats and user resistance to health information technology: a case study of a public hospital', Journal of Decision Systems, 29(1), pp. 27-52. doi: 10.1080/12460125.2020.1728988
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© 2020, Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an item published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Decision Systems on 24 February 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/12460125.2020.1728988