The effect of simulation-based training on initial performance of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade in a clinical setting – a pilot study

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dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Owen
dc.contributor.author Iohom, Gabriella
dc.contributor.author O'Donnell, Brian D.
dc.contributor.author Shorten, George D.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-20T10:41:11Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-20T10:41:11Z
dc.date.issued 2014-11-26
dc.identifier.citation O’SULLIVAN, O., IOHOM, G., O’DONNELL, B. D. & SHORTEN, G. D. 2014. The effect of simulation-based training on initial performance of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade in a clinical setting – a pilot study. BMC Anesthesiology, 14:110, 1-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2253-14-110 en
dc.identifier.volume 14 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2253
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2197
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2253-14-110
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: In preparing novice anesthesiologists to perform their first ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, we hypothesized that virtual reality simulation-based training offers an additional learning benefit over standard training. We carried out pilot testing of this hypothesis using a prospective, single blind, randomized controlled trial. METHODS: We planned to recruit 20 anesthesiologists who had no experience of performing ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. Initial standardized training, reflecting current best available practice was provided to all participating trainees. Trainees were randomized into one of two groups; (i) to undertake additional simulation-based training or (ii) no further training. On completion of their assigned training, trainees attempted their first ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade. Two experts, blinded to the trainees’ group allocation, assessed the performance of trainees using validated tools. RESULTS: This study was discontinued following a planned interim analysis, having recruited 10 trainees. This occurred because it became clear that the functionality of the available simulator was insufficient to meet our training requirements. There were no statistically significant difference in clinical performance, as assessed using the sum of a Global Rating Score and a checklist score, between simulation-based training [mean 32.9 (standard deviation 11.1)] and control trainees [31.5 (4.2)] (p = 0.885). CONCLUSIONS: We have described a methodology for assessing the effectiveness of a simulator, during its development, by means of a randomized controlled trial. We believe that the learning acquired will be useful if performing future trials on learning efficacy associated with simulation based training in procedural skills. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01965314. Registered October 17th 2013. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2014 O’Sullivan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia en
dc.subject Simulation en
dc.subject Validation en
dc.subject Virtual reality en
dc.subject Procedural training en
dc.subject Technology en
dc.subject Enhanced learning en
dc.subject Reality-based simulator en
dc.title The effect of simulation-based training on initial performance of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade in a clinical setting – a pilot study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Gabriella Iohom, Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-492-3000 Email: giohom@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Anesthesiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Open Access articles licensed via CC-BY 4.0 with UCC affiliated authors. Uploaded Jan 2016. en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress giohom@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 110


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© 2014 O’Sullivan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014 O’Sullivan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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