Increasing late stage colorectal cancer and rectal cancer mortality demonstrates the need for screening: a population based study in Ireland, 1994-2010

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dc.contributor.author Clarke, Nicholas
dc.contributor.author McDevitt, Joseph
dc.contributor.author Kearney, Patricia M.
dc.contributor.author Sharp, Linda
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-25T15:21:13Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-25T15:21:13Z
dc.date.issued 2014-05-13
dc.identifier.citation CLARKE, N., MCDEVITT, J., KEARNEY, P. M. & SHARP, L. 2014. Increasing late stage colorectal cancer and rectal cancer mortality demonstrates the need for screening: a population based study in Ireland, 1994-2010. BMC Gastroenterology, 14, 1-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-14-92 en
dc.identifier.volume 14 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-230X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2212
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-230x-14-92
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: This paper describes trends in colorectal cancer incidence, survival and mortality from 1994 to 2010 in Ireland prior to the introduction of population-based screening. METHODS: We examined incidence (National Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI) and mortality (Central Statistics Office) from 1994 to 2010. Age standardised rates (ASR) for incidence and mortality have been calculated, weighted by the European standard population. Annual percentage change was calculated in addition to testing for linear trends in treatment and case fraction of early and late stage disease. Relative survival was calculated considering deaths from all causes. RESULTS: The colorectal cancer ASR was 63.7 per 100,000 in males and 38.7 per 100,000 in females in 2010. There was little change in the ASR over time in either sex, or when colon and rectal cancers were considered separately; however the number of incident cancers increased significantly during 1994-2010 (1752 to 2298). The case fractions of late stage (III/IV) colon and rectal cancers rose significantly over time. One and 5 year relative survival improved for both sexes between the periods 1994-2008. Colorectal cancer mortality ASRs decreased annually from 1994-2009 by 1.8% (95% CI -2.2, -1.4). Rectal cancer mortality ASRs rose annually by 2.4% (95% CI 1.1, 3.6) and 2.8% (95% CI 1.2, 4.4) in males and females respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Increases in late-stage disease and rectal cancer mortality demonstrate an urgent need for colorectal cancer screening. However, the narrow age range at which screening is initially being rolled-out in Ireland means that the full potential for reductions in late-stage cancers and incidence and mortality are unlikely to be achieved. While it is possible that the observed increase in rectal cancer mortality may be partly an artefact of cause of death misclassification, it could also be explained by variations in treatment and adherence to best practice guidelines; further investigation is warranted. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Cancer Society (Grant: CRS11CLA) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2014 Clarke et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ en
dc.subject Colorectal en
dc.subject Cancer en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.subject Incidence en
dc.subject Survival en
dc.subject Mortality en
dc.subject Mass screening en
dc.subject Colon en
dc.subject Rectal en
dc.subject Occult blood tests en
dc.subject Endorectal ultrasonography en
dc.subject Accuracy en
dc.subject Europe en
dc.subject Rates en
dc.subject Regression en
dc.subject Diagnosis en
dc.subject Outcomes en
dc.subject Therapy en
dc.title Increasing late stage colorectal cancer and rectal cancer mortality demonstrates the need for screening: a population based study in Ireland, 1994-2010 en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Nicholas Clarke, Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: nicholas.clarke@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Cancer Society en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Gastroenterology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Open Access articles licensed via CC-BY 2.0 with UCC affiliated authors. Uploaded Jan 2016. en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress nicholas.clarke@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 92


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© 2014 Clarke et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014 Clarke et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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