The effects of individual, family and environmental factors on physical activity levels in children: a cross-sectional study

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dc.contributor.author Cadogan, Sharon L.
dc.contributor.author Keane, Eimear
dc.contributor.author Kearney, Patricia M.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-25T15:21:41Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-25T15:21:41Z
dc.date.issued 2014-04-21
dc.identifier.citation CADOGAN, S. L., KEANE, E. & KEARNEY, P. M. 2014. The effects of individual, family and environmental factors on physical activity levels in children: a cross-sectional study. BMC Pediatrics, 14, 1-13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-14-107 en
dc.identifier.volume 14 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 13 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2431
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2213
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2431-14-107
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Physical activity plays an important role in optimising physical and mental health during childhood, adolescence, and throughout adult life. This study aims to identify individual, family and environmental factors that determine physical activity levels in a population sample of children in Ireland. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of the first wave (2008) of the nationally representative Growing Up in Ireland study. A two-stage clustered sampling method was used where national schools served as the primary sampling unit (response rate: 82%) and age eligible children from participating schools were the secondary units (response rate: 57%). Parent reported child physical activity levels and potential covariates (parent and child reported) include favourite hobby, total screen time, sports participation and child body mass index (measured by trained researcher). Univariate and multivariate multinomial logistic regression (forward block entry) examined the association between individual, family and environmental level factors and physical activity levels. RESULTS: The children (N = 8,568) were classified as achieving low (25%), moderate (20%) or high (55%) physical activity levels. In the fully adjusted model, male gender (OR 1.64 [95% CI: 1.34-2.01]), having an active favourite hobby (OR 1.65 [95% CI: 1.31-2.08]) and membership of sports or fitness team (OR 1.90 [95% CI: 1.48-2.45]) were significantly associated with being in the high physical activity group. Exceeding two hours total screen time (OR 0.66 [95% CI: 0.52-0.85]), being overweight (OR 0.41 [95% CI: 0.27-0.61]; or obese (OR 0.68 [95% CI: 0.54-0.86]) were significantly associated with decreased odds of being in the high physical activity group. CONCLUSIONS: Individual level factors appear to predict PA levels when considered in the multiple domains. Future research should aim to use more robust objective measures to explore the usefulness of the interconnect that exists across these domains. In particular how the family and environmental settings could be useful facilitators for consistent individual level factors such as sports participation. en
dc.description.sponsorship Government of Ireland (Growing Up in Ireland Study: Department of Children and Youth Affairs; Department of Social Protection; Central Statistics Office); Health Research Board (HRB Centre for Health and Diet Research); National Children's Research Centre, Crumlin. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2014 Cadogan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ en
dc.subject Physical activity levels en
dc.subject Active en
dc.subject Children en
dc.subject Determinants en
dc.subject Predictors en
dc.subject Individual en
dc.subject Family en
dc.subject Environmental en
dc.subject School en
dc.subject Sedentary behaviours en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject Adolescents en
dc.subject Television en
dc.subject Childhood en
dc.subject Youth en
dc.subject Overweight en
dc.subject Adulthood en
dc.subject Growing Up in Ireland study en
dc.subject.lcsh Family en
dc.title The effects of individual, family and environmental factors on physical activity levels in children: a cross-sectional study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Sharon Cadogan, Epidemiology & Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-420-5523 Email: scadogan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder National Children’s Research Centre, Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Children and Youth Affairs, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Department of Social Protection, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Central Statistics Office, Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Pediatrics en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Open Access articles licensed via CC-BY 2.0 with UCC affiliated authors. Uploaded Jan 2016. en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress scadogan@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 107


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© 2014 Cadogan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014 Cadogan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd., 2014. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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