A degenerate PCR-based strategy as a means of identifying homologues of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes in the gut microbiota

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dc.contributor.author Fouhy, Fiona
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Gerald F.
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-04T15:05:54Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-04T15:05:54Z
dc.date.issued 2014-02-05
dc.identifier.citation FOUHY, F., ROSS, R. P., FITZGERALD, G. F., STANTON, C. & COTTER, P. D. 2014. A degenerate PCR-based strategy as a means of identifying homologues of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes in the gut microbiota. BMC Microbiology, 14:25, 1-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2180-14-25 en
dc.identifier.volume 14 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2180
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2253
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2180-14-25
dc.description.abstract Background: The potential for the human gut microbiota to serve as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes has been the subject of recent discussion. However, this has yet to be investigated using a rapid PCR-based approach. In light of this, here we aim to determine if degenerate PCR primers can detect aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes in the gut microbiota of healthy adults, without the need for an initial culture-based screen for resistant isolates. In doing so, we would determine if the gut microbiota of healthy adults, lacking recent antibiotic exposure, is a reservoir for resistance genes. Results: The strategy employed resulted in the identification of numerous aminoglycoside (acetylation, adenylation and phosphorylation) and β-lactam (including bla OXA, bla TEM, bla SHV and bla CTX-M) resistance gene homologues. On the basis of homology, it would appear that these genes originated from different bacterial taxa, with members of the Enterobacteriaceae being a particularly rich source. The results demonstrate that, even in the absence of recent antibiotic exposure, the human gut microbiota is a considerable reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated that the gut can be a significant source of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes, even in the absence of recent antibiotic exposure. The results also demonstrate that PCR-based approaches can be successfully applied to detect antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut microbiota, without the need to isolate resistant strains. This approach could also be used to rapidly screen other complex environments for target genes. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (EMBARK scholarship for Fiona Fouhy); Teagasc (Walsh Fellowship for Fiona Fouhy); Irish Government National Development Plan (Science Foundation Ireland Investigator award 11/PI/1137) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © Fouhy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0 en
dc.subject Antibiotic resistance en
dc.subject Aminoglycosides en
dc.subject β-lactam en
dc.subject Gut microbiota en
dc.subject PCR en
dc.title A degenerate PCR-based strategy as a means of identifying homologues of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes in the gut microbiota en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Ross, College of Science, Engineering and Food Science, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Government en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Microbiology en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 25


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© Fouhy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Fouhy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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