Association of blood pressure with development of metabolic syndrome components: a five-year retrospective cohort study in Beijing

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dc.contributor.author Huo, Da
dc.contributor.author Tao, Lixin
dc.contributor.author Li, Xia
dc.contributor.author Wang, Wei
dc.contributor.author Wang, Zhaoping
dc.contributor.author Chen, Dongning
dc.contributor.author Zhu, Huiping
dc.contributor.author Yang, Xinghua
dc.contributor.author Luo, Yanxia
dc.contributor.author Guo, Xiuhua
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-08T13:29:20Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-08T13:29:20Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10-02
dc.identifier.citation HUO, D., TAO, L., LI, X., WANG, W., WANG, Z., CHEN, D., ZHU, H., YANG, X., LUO, Y. & GUO, X. 2013. Association of blood pressure with development of metabolic syndrome components: a five-year Retrospective Cohort study in Beijing. BMC Public Health, 13:912, 1-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-912 en
dc.identifier.volume 13 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 9 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2263
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2458-13-912
dc.description.abstract Background: Raised blood pressure (BP) is associated with the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). It is unknown if subjects with different BP levels may develop certain components of MetS over time. We investigated the incidence of MetS relative to different levels of BP over a 5-year period in a Chinese population in Tongren Hospital, Beijing. Methods: During the period of 2006–2011, we recruited 2,781 participants with no MetS, or self-reported type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, or cardiovascular disease at baseline. Association rule was used to identify the transitions of MetS components over time. Results: The incidence of MetS at follow-up was 9.74% for men and 3.21% for women in the group with optimal BP; 10.29% and 7.22%, respectively, in the group with normal BP; 10.49% and 10.84%, respectively, in the group with high-normal BP; and 14.48% and 23.21%, respectively in the group with high BP. The most common transition was from healthy to healthy in the groups with optimal or normal BP (17.9–49.3%), whereas in the high-normal BP group, 16.9-22.1% of subjects with raised BP returned to healthy status or stayed unchanged, while 13.8-21.4% of people with high BP tended to develop raised fasting glucose levels. Conclusions: The incidence of MetS increased in parallel with the increase in BP. People with optimal and normal BP levels were less susceptible to developing MetS over time, whereas abnormal BP seemed to be a pre-existing phase of MetS. High-normal BP was a crucial status for MetS prevention. en
dc.description.sponsorship Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Serial Numbers 7131002 and 7122016); National Program for Key Science and Technology Projects, China (Serial Number 2011BAI08B01); National Natural Science Fund, China (Serial Number 81373099) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © Huo et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0 en
dc.subject Metabolic syndrome en
dc.subject Blood pressure en
dc.subject Retrospective cohort study en
dc.subject Chinese en
dc.subject Risk factor en
dc.subject Cardiovascular disease en
dc.subject Heart disease en
dc.subject Hypertension en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Health en
dc.subject Adults en
dc.subject Women en
dc.subject Dyslipidemia en
dc.subject Population en
dc.title Association of blood pressure with development of metabolic syndrome components: a five-year retrospective cohort study in Beijing en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Xia Li, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: xia.lee@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation
dc.contributor.funder National Program for Key Science & Technology Projects, China
dc.contributor.funder National Natural Science Fund, China
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Public Health en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress xia.lee@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 912


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© Huo et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Huo et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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