The gut microbiota composition in dichorionic triplet sets suggests a role for host genetic factors

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dc.contributor.author Murphy, Kiera
dc.contributor.author O'Shea, Carol Anne
dc.contributor.author Ryan, C. Anthony
dc.contributor.author Dempsey, Eugene M.
dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Paul W.
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T10:07:58Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T10:07:58Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Murphy K, O’ Shea CA, Ryan CA, Dempsey EM, O' Toole PW, Stanton C, et al. (2015) The Gut Microbiota Composition in Dichorionic Triplet Sets Suggests a Role for Host Genetic Factors. PLoS ONE 10(4): e0122561. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122561
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.issued 4 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2310
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0122561
dc.description.abstract Monozygotic and dizygotic twin studies investigating the relative roles of host genetics and environmental factors in shaping gut microbiota composition have produced conflicting results. In this study, we investigated the gut microbiota composition of a healthy dichorionic triplet set. The dichorionic triplet set contained a pair of monozygotic twins and a fraternal sibling, with similar pre- and post-natal environmental conditions including feeding regime. V4 16S rRNA and rpoB amplicon pyrosequencing was employed to investigate microbiota composition, and the species and strain diversity of the culturable bifidobacterial population was also examined. At month 1, the monozygotic pair shared a similar microbiota distinct to the fraternal sibling. By month 12 however, the profile was more uniform between the three infants. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) of the microbiota composition revealed strong clustering of the monozygotic pair at month 1 and a separation of the fraternal infant. At months 2 and 3 the phylogenetic distance between the monozygotic pair and the fraternal sibling has greatly reduced and by month 12 the monozygotic pair no longer clustered separately from the fraternal infant. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the bifidobacterial population revealed a lack of strain diversity, with identical strains identified in all three infants at month 1 and 12. The microbiota of two antibiotic-treated dichorionic triplet sets was also investigated. Not surprisingly, in both triplet sets early life antibiotic administration appeared to be a major determinant of microbiota composition at month 1, irrespective of zygosity. By month 12, early antibiotic administration appeared to no longer exert such a strong influence on gut microbiota composition. We hypothesize that initially host genetics play a significant role in the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, unless an antibiotic intervention is given, but by month 12 environmental factors are the major determinant. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland (INFANTMET Project 10/RD/Infantmet/MFRC/705); Teagasc (Walsh Fellowship); Irish Government (National Development Plan Grant No. 02/CE/B124 and 07/CE/B1368)) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 Murphy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Early life en
dc.subject Antibiotics en
dc.subject Asthma en
dc.subject Generation en
dc.subject Childhood en
dc.subject Diversity en
dc.subject Sequences en
dc.subject Exposure en
dc.subject Children en
dc.subject Newborns en
dc.title The gut microbiota composition in dichorionic triplet sets suggests a role for host genetic factors en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Ross, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 348782974
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000353014700020
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder APC Microbiome Institute, College of Medicine and Health, University College Cork
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Irish Government
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.dempsey@ucc.ie
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.dempsey@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e0122561


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© 2015 Murphy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Murphy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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