Identification of aminoglycoside and beta-lactam resistance genes from within an infant gut functional metagenomic library

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dc.contributor.author Fouhy, Fiona
dc.contributor.author Ogilvie, Lesley A.
dc.contributor.author Jones, Brian V.
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author Ryan, C. Anthony
dc.contributor.author Dempsey, Eugene M.
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Gerald F.
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:43:39Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:43:39Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Fouhy F, Ogilvie LA, Jones BV, Ross RP, Ryan AC, Dempsey EM, et al. (2014) Identification of Aminoglycoside and β-Lactam Resistance Genes from within an Infant Gut Functional Metagenomic Library. PLoS ONE 9(9): e108016. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0108016
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 9 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2326
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0108016
dc.description.abstract The infant gut microbiota develops rapidly during the first 2 years of life, acquiring microorganisms from diverse sources. During this time, significant opportunities exist for the infant to acquire antibiotic resistant bacteria, which can become established and constitute the infant gut resistome. With increased antibiotic resistance limiting our ability to treat bacterial infections, investigations into resistance reservoirs are highly pertinent. This study aimed to explore the nascent resistome in antibiotically-naive infant gut microbiomes, using a combination of metagenomic approaches. Faecal samples from 22 six-month-old infants without previous antibiotic exposure were used to construct a pooled metagenomic library, which was functionally screened for ampicillin and gentamicin resistance. Our library of similar to 220Mb contained 0.45 ampicillin resistant hits/Mb and 0.059 gentamicin resistant hits/Mb. PCR-based analysis of fosmid clones and uncloned metagenomic DNA, revealed a diverse and abundant aminoglycoside and beta-lactam resistance reservoir within the infant gut, with resistance determinants exhibiting homology to those found in common gut inhabitants, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Clostridium difficile, as well as to genes from cryptic environmental bacteria. Notably, the genes identified differed from those revealed when a sequence-driven PCR-based screen of metagenomic DNA was employed. Carriage of these antibiotic resistance determinants conferred substantial, but varied (2-512x), increases in antibiotic resistance to their bacterial host. These data provide insights into the infant gut resistome, revealing the presence of a varied aminoglycoside and beta-lactam resistance reservoir even in the absence of selective pressure, confirming the infant resistome establishes early in life, perhaps even at birth. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (EMBARK scholarship); Science Foundation Ireland (Investigator Award 11/PI/1137); Medical Research Council, United Kingdom (Grant No. G0901553) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 Fouhy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Antibiotic resistance en
dc.subject Intestinal microbiota en
dc.subject Staphylococcus aureus en
dc.subject Escherichia coli en
dc.subject CTX-M en
dc.subject Reveals en
dc.subject PCR en
dc.subject Enterococci en
dc.subject Ampicillin en
dc.subject Enzymes en
dc.title Identification of aminoglycoside and beta-lactam resistance genes from within an infant gut functional metagenomic library en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Ross, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 275815832
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000342351800052
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Irish Government
dc.contributor.funder APC Microbiome Institute, College of Medicine and Health, University College Cork
dc.contributor.funder Medical Research Council, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.funder Society for Applied Microbiology, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.funder University of Brighton, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.funder Healthcare Infection Society, United Kingdom
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.dempsey@ucc.ie
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress p.ross@ucc.ie
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress p.ross@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e108016


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© 2015 Fouhy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Fouhy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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