Malaria prevention in north-eastern Tanzania: patterns of expenditure and determinants of demand at the household level.

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dc.contributor.author McElroy, Brendan
dc.contributor.author Wiseman, V.
dc.contributor.author Matovu, F.
dc.contributor.author Mwengee, W.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-23T08:41:14Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-23T08:41:14Z
dc.date.issued 2009-05-07
dc.identifier.citation McElroy B., Wiseman V., Matovu F. and Mwengee W. (2009) 'Malaria prevention in north-eastern Tanzania: patterns of expenditure and determinants of demand at the household level'. Malaria Journal, 8:95. DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-8-95 en
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.startpage 95-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 95-10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1475-2875
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3016
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1475-2875-8-95
dc.description.abstract Objective. This study aims to provide a better understanding of the amounts spent on different malaria prevention products and the determinants of these expenditures. Methods. 1,601 households were interviewed about their expenditure on malaria mosquito nets in the past five years, net re-treatments in the past six months and other expenditures prevention in the past two weeks. Simple random sampling was used to select villages and streets while convenience sampling was used to select households. Expenditure was compared across bed nets, aerosols, coils, indoor spraying, using smoke, drinking herbs and cleaning outside environment. Findings. 68% of households owned at least one bed net and 27% had treated their nets in the past six months. 29% were unable to afford a net. Every fortnight, households spent an average of US $0.18 on nets and their treatment, constituting about 47% of total prevention expenditure. Sprays, repellents and coils made up 50% of total fortnightly expenditure (US$0.21). Factors positively related to expenditure were household wealth, years of education of household head, household head being married and rainy season. Poor quality roads and living in a rural area had a negative impact on expenditure. Conclusion. Expenditure on bed nets and on alternative malaria prevention products was comparable. Poor households living in rural areas spend significantly less on all forms of malaria prevention compared to their richer counterparts. Breaking the cycle between malaria and poverty is one of the biggest challenges facing malaria control programmes in Africa. en
dc.description.sponsorship Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Gates Malaria Partnership at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central en
dc.rights © 2009 McElroy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en
dc.subject Malaria en
dc.subject Tanzania en
dc.subject Malaria control en
dc.subject Healthcare disparities en
dc.subject Mosquito nets en
dc.subject Bed nets en
dc.subject Expenditure en
dc.title Malaria prevention in north-eastern Tanzania: patterns of expenditure and determinants of demand at the household level. en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Brendan McElroy, Economics, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: b.mcelroy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2012-11-12T16:25:01Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 13618032
dc.contributor.funder Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Malaria Journal en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress b.mcelroy@ucc.ie en


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© 2009 McElroy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2009 McElroy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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