International parental migration and the psychological well-being of children in Ghana, Nigeria, and Angola

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dc.contributor.author Mazzucato, Valentina
dc.contributor.author Cebotari, Victor
dc.contributor.author Veale, Angela
dc.contributor.author White, Allen
dc.contributor.author Grassi, Marzia
dc.contributor.author Vivet, Jeanne
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-16T10:16:24Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-16T10:16:24Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05
dc.identifier.citation Mazzucato, V., Cebotari, V., Veale, A., White, A., Grassi, M. and Vivet, J. (2015) ‘International parental migration and the psychological well-being of children in Ghana, Nigeria, and Angola’, Social Science and Medicine, 132, pp. 215-224. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.10.058 en
dc.identifier.volume 132 en
dc.identifier.startpage 215 en
dc.identifier.endpage 224 en
dc.identifier.issn 0277-9536
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3645
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.10.058
dc.description.abstract When parents migrate, leaving their children in the origin country, transnational families are formed. Transnational family studies on children who are “left behind” indicate that children suffer psychologically from parental migration. Many of the factors identified as affecting children's responses to parental migration however are not considered in child psychology and family sociology studies. This study aims to bridge these areas of knowledge by quantitatively investigating the association between transnational families and children's psychological well-being. It analyzes a survey conducted in three African countries in 2010–11 (Ghana N = 2760; Angola N = 2243; Nigeria N = 2168) amongst pupils of secondary schools. The study compares children in transnational families to those living with their parents in their country of origin. Children's psychological well-being is measured through the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses reveal that children in transnational families fare worse than their counterparts living with both parents but not in Ghana where living conditions mediate this relationship. This paper also looks at four characteristics of transnational families and finds that specific characteristics of transnational families and country contexts matter: (1) changing caregivers is associated with poorer well-being in all countries; (2) which parent migrates does not make a difference in Ghana, when mothers migrate and fathers are caregivers results in poorer well-being in Nigeria, and both mother's and father's migration result in worse outcomes in Angola; (3) the kin relationship of the caregiver is not associated with poorer well-being in Ghana and Nigeria but is in Angola; (4) children with parents who migrate internationally do not show different results than children whose parents migrate nationally in Ghana and Nigeria but in Angola international parental migration is associated with poorer psychological well-being. The study shows that broader characteristics in the population rather than parental migration per se are associated with decreased levels of well-being. en
dc.description.sponsorship New Opportunities for Research Funding Agency Co-operation in Europe (NORFACE), the Netherlands (Research Program “Migration in Europe: Social, Economic, Cultural and Policy Dynamics”, Grant Number NORFACE-315); Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (WOTRO/NWO Grant Number W01.65.316) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd en
dc.rights © 2015, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Child en
dc.subject Psychology en
dc.subject Development en
dc.subject Wellbeing en
dc.subject Angola en
dc.subject Nigeria en
dc.subject Ghana en
dc.subject Migration en
dc.subject Transnational en
dc.subject Transnational families en
dc.subject Child well-being en
dc.subject Psychological health en
dc.subject School children en
dc.title International parental migration and the psychological well-being of children in Ghana, Nigeria, and Angola en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Angela Veale, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.veale@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-02-16T09:55:07Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 285398684
dc.contributor.funder Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek en
dc.contributor.funder New Opportunities for Research Funding Agency Co-operation in Europe (NORFACE), the Netherlands
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Social Science and Medicine en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.veale@ucc.ie en


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© 2015, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).
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