Abstract concepts and aging: An embodied and grounded perspective

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dc.contributor.author Borghi, Anna M.
dc.contributor.author Setti, Annalisa
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-20T11:39:45Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-20T11:39:45Z
dc.date.issued 2017-05-22
dc.identifier.citation Borghi, A. M. and Setti, A. (2017) 'Abstract Concepts and Aging: An Embodied and Grounded Perspective', Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 430 (4pp). doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00430 en
dc.identifier.volume 8
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 4
dc.identifier.issn 1664-1078
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4107
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00430
dc.description.abstract How do we represent abstract concepts, as “justice” and “phantasy”? This issue has become hotly debated within embodied and grounded cognition views (for reviews: Pecher et al., 2011; Dove, 2016; Borghi et al., 2017). It is in fact unclear how such views can explain how we represent concepts that do not have single concrete referents and are rather detached from sensory experience (Barsalou, 2003; Binder, 2016). In spite of the increasing interest for this issue, to date evidence on abstract concepts across the lifespan is limited. Assuming that the representation of abstract concepts changes from adulthood to older age, in this paper we discuss how a new embodied and grounded proposal, the Words As social Tools (WAT) view (Borghi and Binkofski, 2014), can explain how abstract concepts are represented by older individuals. More specifically we will advance hypotheses on abstract concepts in aging focusing on WAT, and reinterpret previous findings in light of it. We propose that WAT can account for existing findings and provide a suitable framework to test conceptual knowledge in older adults en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.relation.uri http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00430/full
dc.rights © 2017, Borghi and Setti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Abstract concepts en
dc.subject Abstract words en
dc.subject Words as tools en
dc.subject Aging en
dc.subject Elderly en
dc.subject Embodied cognition en
dc.subject Grounded cognition en
dc.title Abstract concepts and aging: An embodied and grounded perspective en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Annalisa Setti, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.setti@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Psychology en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.setti@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 430


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© 2017, Borghi and Setti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, Borghi and Setti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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