Limitation of grassland productivity by low temperature and seasonality of growth

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dc.contributor.author Wingler, Astrid
dc.contributor.author Hennessy, Deirdre
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-20T11:39:45Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-20T11:39:45Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-27
dc.identifier.citation Wingler, A. and Hennessy, D. (2016) 'Limitation of grassland productivity by low temperature and seasonality of growth', Frontiers in Plant Science, 7, 1130 (6pp). doi:10.3389/fpls.2016.01130 en
dc.identifier.volume 7
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 6
dc.identifier.issn 1664-462X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4110
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpls.2016.01130
dc.description.abstract The productivity of temperate grassland is limited by the response of plants to low temperature, affecting winter persistence and seasonal growth rates. During the winter, the growth of perennial grasses is restricted by a combination of low temperature and the lack of available light, but during early spring low ground temperature is the main limiting factor. Once temperature increases, growth is stimulated, resulting in a peak in growth in spring before growth rates decline later in the season. Growth is not primarily limited by the ability to photosynthesize, but controlled by active regulatory processes that, e.g., enable plants to restrict growth and conserve resources for cold acclimation and winter survival. An insufficient ability to cold acclimate can affect winter persistence, thereby also reducing grassland productivity. While some mechanistic knowledge is available that explains how low temperature limits plant growth, the seasonal mechanisms that promote growth in response to increasing spring temperatures but restrict growth later in the season are only partially understood. Here, we assess the available knowledge of the physiological and signaling processes that determine growth, including hormonal effects, on cellular growth and on carbohydrate metabolism. Using data for grass growth in Ireland, we identify environmental factors that limit growth at different times of the year. Ideas are proposed how developmental factors, e.g., epigenetic changes, can lead to seasonality of the growth response to temperature. We also discuss perspectives for modeling grass growth and breeding to improve grassland productivity in a changing climate. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.relation.uri http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2016.01130/full
dc.rights © 2016, Wingler and Hennessy. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Brassinosteroids en
dc.subject Gibberellins en
dc.subject Grass breeding en
dc.subject Growth modelling en
dc.subject Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) en
dc.subject Phytohormones en
dc.subject Seasonality en
dc.subject Winter persistence en
dc.title Limitation of grassland productivity by low temperature and seasonality of growth en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Astrid Wingler, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: astrid.wingler@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Plant Science en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress astrid.wingler@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 1130


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© 2016, Wingler and Hennessy. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Wingler and Hennessy. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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