Sex and orientation identity matter in the substance use behaviors of sexual minority adolescents in the United States

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dc.contributor.author Caputi, Theodore L.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-22T10:07:32Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-22T10:07:32Z
dc.date.issued 2018-03-08
dc.identifier.citation Caputi, T. L. (2018) 'Sex and orientation identity matter in the substance use behaviors of sexual minority adolescents in the United States', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, In Press, doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.01.012 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 29 en
dc.identifier.issn 0376-8716
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5675
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.01.012
dc.description.abstract Background: Health sciences researchers are beginning to understand the differing experiences and health risks among sexual minority subgroups (i.e., those who describe themselves as homosexual/gay/lesbian, bisexual, or unsure/questioning). Such research can promote the allocation of resources to high-risk groups and the development of interventions tailored to their needs. The present study extends this line of research to substance use among adolescents. Methods: The lifetime and/or past 30-day alcohol, tobacco, cigarette, e-cigarette, marijuana, prescription drug, and illicit drug use of sexual minority and heterosexual adolescents was analyzed using data from the 2015 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Controlling for confounders, separate logistic regression models were fit for each substance use outcome. A simulation-based strategy was employed to report adjusted risk ratios for each substance use outcome for each sexual minority subgroup. Results: Sexual minority females, particularly bisexual females, were at an elevated risk for substance use. For example, compared to heterosexual females, sexual minority females were 1.35 (95%CI 1.16–1.56) times more likely to have used a substance in the past 30 days, and bisexual females had an even further elevated risk ratio (RR: 1.48, 95%CI 1.28–1.69). Conclusions: Studying the variance among sexual minority subgroups will help practitioners, advocates, and policymakers identify high risk subgroups. In the case of substance use, this study suggests sexual minority females, particularly bisexual females, should become a target population for prevention and other interventions. The study conducts post-hoc analyses on secondary data, and so these results should be verified in more targeted studies. en
dc.description.sponsorship US-Ireland Alliance (George J. Mitchell Scholarship) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.rights © 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Sexual minority en
dc.subject Substance use en
dc.subject Lesbian en
dc.subject Gay en
dc.subject Bisexual en
dc.subject Questioning en
dc.subject Alcohol en
dc.subject Marijuana en
dc.subject Prescription drugs en
dc.title Sex and orientation identity matter in the substance use behaviors of sexual minority adolescents in the United States en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Theodore Caputi, Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-03-07
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.contributor.funder US-Ireland Alliance en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Drug and Alcohol Dependence en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress 117220546@umail.ucc.ie
dc.internal.bibliocheck In Press march 2018. Update citation, start page, end page, add vol. issue number. en


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© 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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