Genetic stock identification of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations in the southern part of the European range

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dc.contributor.author Griffiths, Andrew M.
dc.contributor.author Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo
dc.contributor.author Dillane, Eileen
dc.contributor.author Coughlan, Jamie P.
dc.contributor.author Horreo, Jose L.
dc.contributor.author Bowkett, Andrew E.
dc.contributor.author Minting, Peter
dc.contributor.author Toms, Simon
dc.contributor.author Roche, Willie
dc.contributor.author Gargan, Paddy
dc.contributor.author McGinnity, Philip
dc.contributor.author Cross, Thomas F.
dc.contributor.author Bright, Dylan
dc.contributor.author Garcia-Vazquez, Eva
dc.contributor.author Stevens, Jamie R.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-27T11:22:34Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-27T11:22:34Z
dc.date.issued 2010-04-29
dc.identifier.citation Griffiths, A. M., Machado-Schiaffino, G., Dillane, E., Coughlan, J., Horreo, J. L., Bowkett, A. E., Minting, P., Toms, S., Roche, W., Gargan, P., McGinnity, P., Cross, T., Bright, D., Garcia-Vazquez, E. and Stevens, J. R. (2010) 'Genetic stock identification of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations in the southern part of the European range'. BMC Genetics, 11, 31(27pp). doi:10.1186/1471-2156-11-31 en
dc.identifier.volume 11 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 27 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2156
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5698
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2156-11-31
dc.description.abstract Background: Anadromous migratory fish species such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) have significant economic, cultural and ecological importance, but present a complex case for management and conservation due to the range of their migration. Atlantic salmon exist in rivers across the North Atlantic, returning to their river of birth with a high degree of accuracy; however, despite continuing efforts and improvements in in-river conservation, they are in steep decline across their range. Salmon from rivers across Europe migrate along similar routes, where they have, historically, been subject to commercial netting. This mixed stock exploitation has the potential to devastate weak and declining populations where they are exploited indiscriminately. Despite various tagging and marking studies, the effect of marine exploitation and the marine element of the salmon lifecycle in general, remain the "black-box" of salmon management. In a number of Pacific salmonid species and in several regions within the range of the Atlantic salmon, genetic stock identification and mixed stock analysis have been used successfully to quantify exploitation rates and identify the natal origins of fish outside their home waters - to date this has not been attempted for Atlantic salmon in the south of their European range. Results: To facilitate mixed stock analysis (MSA) of Atlantic salmon, we have produced a baseline of genetic data for salmon populations originating from the largest rivers from Spain to northern Scotland, a region in which declines have been particularly marked. Using 12 microsatellites, 3,730 individual fish from 57 river catchments have been genotyped. Detailed patterns of population genetic diversity of Atlantic salmon at a sub-continent-wide level have been evaluated, demonstrating the existence of regional genetic signatures. Critically, these appear to be independent of more commonly recognised terrestrial biogeographical and political boundaries, allowing reporting regions to be defined. The implications of these results on the accuracy of MSA are evaluated and indicate that the success of MSA is not uniform across the range studied; our findings indicate large differences in the relative accuracy of stock composition estimates and MSA apportioning across the geographical range of the study, with a much higher degree of accuracy achieved when assigning and apportioning to populations in the south of the area studied. This result probably reflects the more genetically distinct nature of populations in the database from Spain, northwest France and southern England. Genetic stock identification has been undertaken and validation of the baseline microsatellite dataset with rod-and-line and estuary net fisheries of known origin has produced realistic estimates of stock composition at a regional scale. Conclusions: This southern European database and supporting phylogeographic and mixed-stock analyses of net samples provide a unique tool for Atlantic salmon research and management, in both their natal rivers and the marine environment. However, the success of MSA is not uniform across the area studied, with large differences in the relative accuracy of stock composition estimates and MSA apportioning, with a much higher degree of accuracy achieved when assigning and apportioning to populations in the south of the region. More broadly, this study provides a basis for long-term salmon management across the region and confirms the value of this genetic approach for fisheries management of anadromous species. en
dc.description.sponsorship European Commission (INTERREG IIIB Programme (Atlantic Salmon Arc Project No. 040). en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.rights © 2010, Griffiths et al. Licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en
dc.subject Monte Carlo Markov chain en
dc.subject Atlantic salmon en
dc.subject River catchment en
dc.subject Baseline sample en
dc.subject Reporting region en
dc.title Genetic stock identification of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations in the southern part of the European range en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Philip McGinnity, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: p.mcginnity@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2018-03-14T12:42:55Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 421652086
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000279858100001
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Genetics en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress P.McGinnity@ucc.ie en


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© 2010, Griffiths et al. Licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2010, Griffiths et al. Licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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