Population genomic analyses of early-phase Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) domestication/captive breeding

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dc.contributor.author Mäkinen, Hannu
dc.contributor.author Vasemägi, Anti
dc.contributor.author McGinnity, Philip
dc.contributor.author Cross, Thomas F.
dc.contributor.author Primmer, Craig R.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-28T08:34:36Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-28T08:34:36Z
dc.date.issued 2014-10-24
dc.identifier.citation Mäkinen, H., Vasemägi, A., McGinnity, P., Cross, T. F., Primmer, C. R. (2015) 'Population genomic analyses of early-phase Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) domestication/captive breeding', Evolutionary Applications, 8(1), pp. 93-107. doi:10.1111/eva.12230 en
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 93 en
dc.identifier.endpage 107 en
dc.identifier.issn 1752-4563
dc.identifier.issn 1752-4571
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5706
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/eva.12230
dc.description.abstract Domestication can have adverse genetic consequences, which may reduce the fitness of individuals once released back into the wild. Many wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) populations are threatened by anthropogenic influences, and they are supplemented with captively bred fish. The Atlantic salmon is also widely used in selective breeding programs to increase the mean trait values for desired phenotypic traits. We analyzed a genomewide set of SNPs in three domesticated Atlantic salmon strains and their wild conspecifics to identify loci underlying domestication. The genetic differentiation between domesticated strains and wild populations was low (FST < 0.03), and domesticated strains harbored similar levels of genetic diversity compared to their wild conspecifics. Only a few loci showed footprints of selection, and these loci were located in different linkage groups among the different wild population/hatchery strain comparisons. Simulated scenarios indicated that differentiation in quantitative trait loci exceeded that in neutral markers during the early phases of divergence only when the difference in the phenotypic optimum between populations was large. This study indicates that detecting selection using standard approaches in the early phases of domestication might be challenging unless selection is strong and the traits under selection show simple inheritance patterns. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. en
dc.relation.uri http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5p7s0
dc.rights © 2014, the Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Adaptation en
dc.subject Aquaculture en
dc.subject Captive populations en
dc.subject Ecological genetics en
dc.subject Population genetics en
dc.subject Empirical en
dc.subject Positive selection en
dc.subject Genetic-variation en
dc.subject Artificial selection en
dc.subject Reduced fitness en
dc.subject Complex traits en
dc.subject Rainbow trout en
dc.subject Soft sweeps en
dc.subject Wild en
dc.title Population genomic analyses of early-phase Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) domestication/captive breeding en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Philip McGinnity, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: p.mcginnity@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2018-03-14T09:25:27Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 372343799
dc.internal.wokid 000348844100008
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Evolutionary Applications en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress P.McGinnity@ucc.ie en


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© 2014, the Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014, the Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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