Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL): a new generic self-reported outcome measure for use with people experiencing mental health difficulties

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dc.contributor.author Keetharuth, Anju Devianee
dc.contributor.author Brazier, John
dc.contributor.author Connell, Janice
dc.contributor.author Bjorner, Jakob Bue
dc.contributor.author Carlton, Jill
dc.contributor.author Buck, Elizabeth Taylor
dc.contributor.author Ricketts, Thomas
dc.contributor.author McKendrick, Kirsty
dc.contributor.author Browne, John P.
dc.contributor.author Croudace, Tim
dc.contributor.author Barkham, Michael
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-18T11:56:18Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-18T11:56:18Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Keetharuth, A. D., Brazier, J., Connell, J., Bjorner, J. B., Carlton, J., Taylor Buck, E., Ricketts, T., McKendrick, K., Browne, J., Croudace, T. and Barkham, M. (2018) 'Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL): a new generic self-reported outcome measure for use with people experiencing mental health difficulties', British Journal of Psychiatry, 212(1), pp. 42-49. doi: 10.1192/bjp.2017.10 en
dc.identifier.volume 212
dc.identifier.issued 1
dc.identifier.startpage 42
dc.identifier.endpage 49
dc.identifier.issn 0007-1250
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6469
dc.identifier.doi 10.1192/bjp.2017.10
dc.description.abstract Background: Outcome measures for mental health services need to adopt a service-user recovery focus. Aims To develop and validate a 10- and 20-item self-report recovery-focused quality of life outcome measure named Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL). Method: Qualitative methods for item development and initial testing, and quantitative methods for item reduction and scale construction were used. Data from >6500 service users were factor analysed and item response theory models employed to inform item selection. The measures were tested for reliability, validity and responsiveness. Results ReQoL-10 and ReQoL-20 contain positively and negatively worded items covering seven themes: activity, hope, belonging and relationships, self-perception, well-being, autonomy, and physical health. Both versions achieved acceptable internal consistency, test-retest reliability (>0.85), known-group differences, convergence with related measures, and were responsive over time (standardised response mean (SRM) >0.4). They performed marginally better than the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and markedly better than the EQ-5D. Conclusions: Both versions are appropriate for measuring service-user recovery-focused quality of life outcomes. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Health (Policy Research Programme); National Institute for Health Research (Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Yorkshire and Humber (NIHR CLAHRC YH) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press en
dc.relation.uri https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry/article/recovering-quality-of-life-reqol-a-new-generic-selfreported-outcome-measure-for-use-with-people-experiencing-mental-health-difficulties/3D8C7C90D326E34230E2FDBEA26AEF8D
dc.rights © 2018, The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Psychological therapies en
dc.subject Personal recovery en
dc.subject Service users en
dc.subject PROMs en
dc.subject EQ-5D en
dc.subject Validity en
dc.subject Schizophrenia en
dc.subject Disorders en
dc.subject Patient-reported outcome measures en
dc.title Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL): a new generic self-reported outcome measure for use with people experiencing mental health difficulties en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John Browne, Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email:J.Browne@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Health
dc.contributor.funder National Institute for Health Research
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle British Journal of Psychiatry en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.browne@ucc.ie en


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© 2018, The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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