Isoquercetin and inulin synergistically modulate the gut microbiome to prevent development of the metabolic syndrome in mice fed a high fat diet

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dc.contributor.author Tan, Si
dc.contributor.author Caparros-Martin, Jose A.
dc.contributor.author Matthews, Vance B.
dc.contributor.author Koch, Henrietta
dc.contributor.author O'Gara, Fergal
dc.contributor.author Croft, Kevin D.
dc.contributor.author Ward, Natalie C.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-29T15:47:26Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-29T15:47:26Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Tan, S., Caparros-Martin, J. A., Matthews, V. B., Koch, H., O’Gara, F., Croft, K. D. and Ward, N. C. (2018) 'Isoquercetin and inulin synergistically modulate the gut microbiome to prevent development of the metabolic syndrome in mice fed a high fat diet', Scientific Reports, 8(1), 10100 (13pp). doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-28521-8 en
dc.identifier.volume 8
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 13
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6673
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-018-28521-8
dc.description.abstract Dietary fibre positively influences gut microbiome composition, enhancing the metabolism of dietary flavonoids to produce bioactive metabolites. These synergistic activities facilitate the beneficial effects of dietary flavonoids on cardiometabolic health parameters. The aims of this study were to investigate whether isoquercetin (a major dietary flavonoid) and inulin (soluble fibre), either alone or in combination could improve features of the metabolic syndrome. Following a 1 week acclimatization, male C57BL6 mice (6-8 weeks) were randomly assigned to; (i) normal chow diet (n = 10), (ii) high fat (HF) diet (n = 10), (iii) HF diet + 0.05% isoquercetin (n = 10), (iv) HF diet + 5% inulin, or (v) HF diet + 0.05% isoquercetin + 5% inulin (n = 10). Body weight and food intake were measured weekly. At 12 weeks, glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed, and blood, faecal samples, liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue were collected. At 12 weeks, mice on the HF diet had significantly elevated body weights as well as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity compared to the normal chow mice. Supplementation with either isoquercetin or inulin had no effect, however mice receiving the combination had attenuated weight gain, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, reduced hepatic lipid accumulation, adipocyte hypertrophy, circulating leptin and adipose FGF21 levels, compared to mice receiving the HF diet. Additionally, mice on the combination diet had improvements in the composition and functionality of their gut microbiome as well as production of short chain fatty acids. In conclusion, long-term supplementation with the dietary flavonoid isoquercetin and the soluble fibre inulin can attenuate development of the metabolic syndrome in mice fed a high fat diet. This protective effect appears to be mediated, in part, through beneficial changes to the microbiome. en
dc.description.sponsorship Curtin University of Technology (Faculty of Health Science) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-28521-8
dc.rights © 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Marker gene-sequences en
dc.subject Growth-factor 21 en
dc.subject E-knockout mice en
dc.subject Endothelial dysfunction en
dc.subject Insulin-resistance en
dc.subject Heme oxygenase-1 en
dc.subject Food-intake en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject Health en
dc.subject Fiber en
dc.title Isoquercetin and inulin synergistically modulate the gut microbiome to prevent development of the metabolic syndrome in mice fed a high fat diet en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Fergal O'Gara, Microbiology , University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: f.ogara@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Curtin University of Technology
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress f.ogara@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 10100


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© 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, the Authors. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
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