The factors associated with food fussiness in Irish school-aged children

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dc.contributor.author Rahill, Stephanie
dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Aileen
dc.contributor.author Walton, Janette
dc.contributor.author McNulty, Breige A.
dc.contributor.author Kearney, John
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-13T14:52:23Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-13T14:52:23Z
dc.date.issued 2018-11-08
dc.identifier.citation Rahill, S., Kennedy, A., Walton, J., McNulty, B. A. and Kearney, J. (2018) 'The factors associated with food fussiness in Irish school-aged children', Public Health Nutrition, In Press, doi: 10.1017/S1368980018002835 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 11 en
dc.identifier.issn 1368-9800
dc.identifier.issn 1475-2727
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7220
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/S1368980018002835
dc.description.abstract Objective: To establish the factors that determine food fussiness, to explore if child age determines the extent to which these factors influence food fussiness and to identify whether parental neophobia is an independent determinant of food fussiness. Design: Cross-sectional data from the National Children’s Food Survey (2003–2004). The Children’s Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) assessed eating behaviours in children. The Food Neophobia Scale (FNS) assessed parental food neophobia. Young children were classified as 5–8 years old with older children classified as 9–12 years old. Setting: Republic of Ireland. Participants: Nationally representative sample of Irish children aged 5–12 years (n 594). Results: Parents identifying child’s food preferences as a barrier to providing their child with a healthy diet was significantly associated with increased food fussiness in younger (P<0·001) and older children (P<0·001). Higher levels of parental neophobia were significantly associated with an increase in food fussiness in younger (P<0·05) and older (P<0·001) children. Food advertising as a barrier to providing a healthy diet was inversely associated with food fussiness in younger children (P<0·05). In older children, there was a significant inverse association between child’s BMI and food fussiness (P<0·05), but not to the extent that a difference in weight status was noted. Family mealtimes in older children were associated with significantly lower levels of food fussiness (P<0·05). Conclusions: Findings from the present study identify that a child’s age does determine the extent to which certain factors influence food fussiness and that parental neophobia is an independent determinant of food fussiness. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Agriculture Food and Marine (under the National Development Plan 2000–2006) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press (CUP) en
dc.relation.uri https://www.cambridge.org/core/article/factors-associated-with-food-fussiness-in-irish-schoolaged-children/8EDEA305A8A66F4FDF8485CAF4B12B47
dc.rights © The Authors 2018, Published by Cambridge University Press (CUP) on behalf of The Nutrition Society en
dc.subject Food fussiness en
dc.subject Parental neophobia en
dc.subject Children en
dc.subject Determinants en
dc.title The factors associated with food fussiness in Irish school-aged children en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Janette Walton, Food & Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: janette.walton@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-11-08
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Public Health Nutrition en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress janette.walton@ucc.ie en


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