Comparative effect of different cooking methods on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of high pressure processed marinated pork chops

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dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Ciara M.
dc.contributor.author Cruz-Romero, Malco C.
dc.contributor.author Duffy, Geraldine
dc.contributor.author Kerry, Joseph P.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-03-21T11:36:21Z
dc.date.available 2019-03-21T11:36:21Z
dc.date.issued 2019-03-13
dc.identifier.citation O'Neill, C. M., Cruz-Romero, M. C., Duffy, G. and Kerry, J. P. (2019) 'Comparative effect of different cooking methods on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of high pressure processed marinated pork chops', Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies. doi:10.1016/j.ifset.2019.03.005 en
dc.identifier.issn 1466-8564
dc.identifier.issn 1878-5522
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7651
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.ifset.2019.03.005
dc.description.abstract The objective of this study was to assess the effect of griddle and steam cooking on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of high pressure processed (HPP) piri-piri marinated pork chops (MPC). Raw MPC that were HPP at 400 MPa had higher (P < 0.05) marinade absorption compared to untreated samples. After cooking, griddled MPC were significantly (P < 0.05) darker, less red, less yellow, tougher and had higher cook loss compared to steam cooked samples. The appearance of the griddled MPC was preferred while the texture, tenderness, juiciness and overall sensory acceptability (OSA) were preferred in steam cooked MPC. The increased marinade absorption in MPC that were HPP modified the fatty acid composition resulting in increased (P < 0.05) levels of oleic acid (C18:1c). Steam cooked MPC had a lower (P < 0.05) n-6: n-3 PUFA ratio and were preferred by the sensory panel compared to griddled MPC. Overall, from the cooking methods assessed steam cooking was the best cooking method for untreated and MPC that were HPP. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Food Institutional Research Measure (FIRM) Grant number-11/F/03) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.relation.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S146685641830568X
dc.rights © 2019, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Flavour absorption en
dc.subject Fatty acid composition en
dc.subject Sensory characteristics en
dc.subject High pressure processed en
dc.subject Steam en
dc.subject Marinated pork chops en
dc.subject Griddle en
dc.subject Physicochemical characteristics en
dc.title Comparative effect of different cooking methods on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of high pressure processed marinated pork chops en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Joseph Kerry, Dept Of Food & Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: joe.kerry@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2020-03-13
dc.date.updated 2019-03-21T11:25:02Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 478334185
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress joe.kerry@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation as necessary.


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© 2019, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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