Biochemical and biomolecular effects induced by a static magnetic field in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence for oxidative stress

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dc.contributor.author Kthiri, Amena
dc.contributor.author Hidouri, Slah
dc.contributor.author Wiem, Tahri
dc.contributor.author Jeridi, Roua
dc.contributor.author Sheehan, David
dc.contributor.author Landouls, Ahmed
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-20T12:00:13Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-20T12:00:13Z
dc.date.issued 2019-01-04
dc.identifier.citation Kthiri, A., Hidouri, S., Wiem, T., Jeridi, R., Sheehan, D. and Landouls, A., 2019. Biochemical and biomolecular effects induced by a static magnetic field in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Evidence for oxidative stress. PloS one, 14(1), e0209843, (12pp.). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0209843 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 12 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7938
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0209843 en
dc.description.abstract Exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) can cause changes in microorganism metabolism altering key subcellular functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an applied SMF could induce biological effects on growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and then to probe biochemical and bio-molecular responses. We found a decrease in growth and viability under SMF (250mT) after 6h with a significant decrease in colony forming units followed by an increase between 6 h and 9 h. Moreover, measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) demonstrated a particular profile suggesting oxidative stress. For instance, SOD and catalase activities increased in magnetized cultures after 9 h compared with unexposed samples. However, SMF exposure caused a decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity. Finally, SMF caused an increase in MDA levels as well as the content of protein carbonyl groups after 6 and 9 h of exposure en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher PLoS ONE en
dc.relation.uri https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0209843
dc.rights © 2019 Kthiri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Microorganism metabolism en
dc.subject Subcellular function en
dc.subject Static magnetic field en
dc.title Biochemical and biomolecular effects induced by a static magnetic field in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence for oxidative stress en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Prof. David Sheehan, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: d.sheehan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLoS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.sheehan@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e0209843 en


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© 2019 Kthiri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 Kthiri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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