Larger food portion sizes are associated with both positive and negative markers of dietary quality in Irish adults

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Lyons, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.author Walton, Janette
dc.contributor.author Flynn, Albert
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-24T13:15:48Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-24T13:15:48Z
dc.date.issued 2018-12-05
dc.identifier.citation Lyons, J., Walton, J. and Flynn, A., 2018. Larger food portion sizes are associated with both positive and negative markers of dietary quality in irish adults. Nutrients, 10(12): 1929 (12pp.) DOI: 10.3390/nu10121929 en
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.issued 12 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 12 en
dc.identifier.issn 2072-6643
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8098
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/nu10121929 en
dc.description.abstract Reduction in portion size, particularly for energy-dense foods, is increasingly addressed in healthy eating guidelines in a bid to tackle the obesity epidemic. The effect of portion size on other aspects of dietary quality, such as nutrient intakes, is less studied. The aim of the current work was to investigate associations between food portion sizes and key indicators of dietary quality, namely energy-adjusted intakes of saturated fat, dietary fibre, sodium, calcium, iron, folate and vitamin D, and dietary energy density (DED), in Irish adults on the days the foods were consumed. Data from the Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey (2008–2010) (n = 1274, 18–64 years, 4-day semi-weighed record) were used for the analysis. DED was lower on the days larger portions of boiled potatoes, fruit, vegetables and baked beans were consumed, and higher on the days larger portions of white bread, ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (RTEBCs), frying meats, cheese, butter, biscuits, chocolate and sugar-sweetened beverages were consumed. Micronutrient intakes were higher on the days larger portions of brown bread, RTEBCs, vegetables and low-fat spreads were consumed, and lower on the days larger portions of white bread, butter, biscuits, chocolate, sugar-sweetened beverages and beer/cider were consumed, with the exception of folate. The study identifies foods for which larger portion sizes may be associated with positive dietary attributes, as well as the opposite. It provides an important evidence base from which more specific dietary guidance on food portion sizes might be developed for Irish adults. en
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Food for Health Research Initiative 2007–2012); Health Research Board (Food for Health Research Initiative 2007–2012); Department of Health, Ireland (Food for Health Research Initiative 2007–2012); en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.relation.uri https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/12/1929
dc.rights © 2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0). en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Portion sizes en
dc.subject Dietary quality en
dc.subject Energy density en
dc.subject Adults en
dc.title Larger food portion sizes are associated with both positive and negative markers of dietary quality in Irish adults en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Jacqueline Lyons, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine en
dc.contributor.funder Department of Health, Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Nutrients en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.flynn@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress janette.walton@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 1929 en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

©  2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement