“That which is crooked can be made straight”: Challenges and opportunities of Assistive Reproductive Technologies (ART) in Ireland in the 21st century

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dc.contributor.author King, Rob
dc.contributor.author Nagy, Andrea
dc.contributor.author Dempsey, Maria
dc.contributor.author Rice, Aoife
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-09T11:13:58Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-09T11:13:58Z
dc.date.issued 2019-07-19
dc.identifier.citation King, R., Nagy, A., Dempsey, M. and Rice, A. (2019) '“That which is crooked can be made straight”: Challenges and opportunities of Assistive Reproductive Technologies (ART) in Ireland in the 21st century', Personality and Individual Differences, 151, 109504 (5pp). doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2019.07.014 en
dc.identifier.volume 151 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 5 en
dc.identifier.issn 0191-8869
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8303
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.paid.2019.07.014 en
dc.description.abstract Objective: Technology offers new opportunities, and challenges of as yet undreamed. Ethical intuitions honed over millions of years of small-group, competitive obligate sexual reproduction may mislead us in relation to new technologies. Between 1999 and 2008 the number of ART treatment cycles increased by 265% in Ireland. Some of the implications of such technologies are profound—challenging existing reproductive understanding. Ireland offers unique opportunities for study as a small country, emerging from a traditional religious past, with almost unregulated access to Assistive Reproductive Technology (ART). Method: Data from an Irish population of varied ages and both sexes (N = 606) were collected through an on-line survey which included demographics and attitudes and knowledge of ART. Results: While interest in ART was high, accurate knowledge was patchy. Latent class analysis revealed a typology of five groups of responders to ART, distinguished by their attitudes and knowledge of this technology. These groups were tentatively labelled as ‘Worried Yet Willing’, ‘Live and Let Live’, ‘Disengaged’, ‘Judgemental’ and ‘Conflicted’. This is a large, demographically representative sample from a country—Ireland—that is actively considering reproductive challenges in the twenty first century. This is therefore a valuable opportunity to access the processes underlining attitudes to these new opportunities and threats. However, even though the sample was reasonably large, women were—perhaps unsurprisingly—over represented. They outnumbered men by 4:1. Follow up research might specifically focus on males, and especially males in certain key demographic sectors. Conclusion: Responses to the introduction of ART in Ireland fell into five distinct groups. These groups had some predicative value in highlighting attitudes to ART provision in prospective groups, though not always in expected ways. Attitudes were generally positive. Understanding the distinguishing features of these types of responders is important for health care professionals regarding service development and delivery. Implications for the direction of future related research is discussed. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2019, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Assistive reprodutive technology en
dc.subject Personality en
dc.subject Fertility en
dc.subject Infertility en
dc.title “That which is crooked can be made straight”: Challenges and opportunities of Assistive Reproductive Technologies (ART) in Ireland in the 21st century en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Robert King, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: r.king@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-07-19
dc.date.updated 2019-08-09T11:05:24Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 492166553
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Personality and Individual Differences en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress r.king@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 109504 en


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© 2019, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence.
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