Psychiatry

Psychiatry

 

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  • Kelly, John R.; Minuto, Chiara; Cryan, John F.; Clarke, Gerard; Dinan, Timothy G. (Frontiers Media, 2017)
    Humans evolved within a microbial ecosystem resulting in an interlinked physiology. The gut microbiota can signal to the brain via the immune system, the vagus nerve or other host-microbe interactions facilitated by gut ...
  • Hoban, Alan E.; Stilling, Roman M.; Moloney, Gerard M.; Moloney, Rachel D.; Shanahan, Fergus; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.; Clarke, Gerard (Biomed Central Ltd, 2017)
    Background: There is growing evidence for a role of the gut microbiome in shaping behaviour relevant to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. Preclinical studies using germ-free (GF) animals have been essential in ...
  • Luczynski, Pauline; Tramullas, Monica; Viola, Maria; Shanahan, Fergus; Clarke, Gerard; O'Mahony, Siobhain; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F. (eLife Sciences Publications Ltd, 2017)
    The perception of visceral pain is a complex process involving the spinal cord and higher order brain structures. Increasing evidence implicates the gut microbiota as a key regulator of brain and behavior, yet it remains ...
  • Peterson, Veronica L.; Jury, Nicholas J.; Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl; Draper, Lorraine A.; Crispie, Fiona; Cotter, Paul D.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Holmes, Andrew; Cryan, John F. (Elsevier Ltd, 2017-02-01)
    The gut microbiota includes a community of bacteria that play an integral part in host health and biological processes. Pronounced and repeated findings have linked gut microbiome to stress, anxiety, and depression. ...
  • Borrelli, Luca; Aceto, Serena; Agnisola, Claudio; De Paolo, Sofia; Dipineto, Ludovico; Stilling, Roman M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.; Menna, Lucia F. (Nature Publishing Group, 2016-07-15)
    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the bi-directional gut–brain axis, a communication that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities. Animal studies reveal that gut bacteria influence behaviour, ...

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