Smartphone monitoring of participants' engagement with home practice during mindfulness-based stress reduction: Observational study

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dc.contributor.author Parsons, Christine E.
dc.contributor.author Madsen, Maria A.
dc.contributor.author Jensen, Kasper Løvborg
dc.contributor.author Kæseler, Simon
dc.contributor.author Fjorback, Lone Overby
dc.contributor.author Piet, Jacob
dc.contributor.author Roepstorff, Andreas
dc.contributor.author Linehan, Conor
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-21T13:07:07Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-21T13:07:07Z
dc.date.issued 2020-01-14
dc.identifier.citation Parsons, C. E., Madsen, M. A., Jensen, K. L., Kæseler, S., Fjorback, L. O., Piet, J., Roepstorff, A. and Linehan, C. (2020) 'Smartphone monitoring of participants' engagement with home practice during mindfulness-based stress reduction: Observational study', JMIR Mental Health, 7(1), e14467 (12pp). doi: 10.2196/14467 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 12 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9546
dc.identifier.doi 10.2196/14467 en
dc.description.abstract Background: Standardized mindfulness training courses involve significant at-home assignments of meditation practice. Participants’ self-reported completion of these assignments has been correlated with treatment outcomes, but self-reported data are often incomplete and potentially biased. In addition, mindfulness teachers typically suggest that participants set aside a regular practice time, preferably in the morning, but the extent to which participants do this has not been empirically examined. Objective: This study aimed to analyze patterns of participant engagement with home practice in a mindfulness-based stress reduction course. Methods: We used a novel smartphone app to provide 25 participants with access to their daily practice assignments during the 8-week course. We analyzed data collected through our smartphone app to determine usage and listening patterns and performed analyses of the regularity and frequency of participant behavior. Results: We found that participants listened to a median of 3 of the 6 practice sessions per week, and they did not typically set aside a regular daily practice time. Across weekdays, participants practiced most frequently in the morning, but there was considerable variation in participants’ practice start times. On weekends, the peak practice time was in the evening. Conclusions: We suggest that it is feasible to integrate a smartphone-monitoring approach into existing mindfulness interventions. High-frequency smartphone monitoring can provide insights into how and when participants complete their homework, information that is important in supporting treatment engagement. en
dc.description.sponsorship TrygFonden (Primary Investigator ID: 117642) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher JMIR Publications en
dc.relation.uri https://mental.jmir.org/2020/1/e14467
dc.rights © 2020, Christine E. Parsons, Maria A. Madsen, Kasper Løvborg Jensen, Simon Kæseler, Lone Overby Fjorback, Jacob Piet, Andreas Roepstorff, Conor Linehan. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 14.01.2020. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Mental Health, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mental.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Mindfulness en
dc.subject Adherence en
dc.subject Smartphone monitoring en
dc.subject Meditation practice en
dc.subject Habit formation en
dc.title Smartphone monitoring of participants' engagement with home practice during mindfulness-based stress reduction: Observational study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Conor Linehan, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: conor.linehan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2020-01-21T12:49:35Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 500175894
dc.contributor.funder TrygFonden
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle MIR Mental Health en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress conor.linehan@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e14467 en
dc.identifier.eissn 2368-7959


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© 2020, Christine E. Parsons, Maria A. Madsen, Kasper Løvborg Jensen, Simon Kæseler, Lone Overby Fjorback, Jacob Piet, Andreas Roepstorff, Conor Linehan. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 14.01.2020. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Mental Health, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mental.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020, Christine E. Parsons, Maria A. Madsen, Kasper Løvborg Jensen, Simon Kæseler, Lone Overby Fjorback, Jacob Piet, Andreas Roepstorff, Conor Linehan. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 14.01.2020. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Mental Health, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://mental.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
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