The role of the microbiota in sedentary life style disorders and ageing: Lessons from the animal kingdom

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dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Paul W.
dc.contributor.author Shiels, Paul G.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-04T13:10:03Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-04T13:10:03Z
dc.date.issued 2020-01-19
dc.identifier.citation O'Toole, P.W. and Shiels, P. G. (2020) 'The role of the microbiota in sedentary life style disorders and ageing: Lessons from the animal kingdom', Journal of Internal Medicine. doi: 10.1111/joim.13021 en
dc.identifier.issn 0954-6820
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9610
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/joim.13021 en
dc.description.abstract A paradox of so-called developed countries is that, as the major historical causes of human mortality are eliminated or mitigated by medical progress, life-style related diseases have become major killers. Furthermore, as life-span is extended by the combined effects of modern medicine, health-span is struggling to keep apace because of the burden of non-communicable diseases linked to diet and sedentary life-style. The gut microbiome is now recognized as a plastic environmental risk factor for many of these diseases, the microbiome being defined as the complex community of co-evolved commensal microbes that breaks down components of a complex diet, modulates innate immunity, and produces signalling molecules and metabolites that can impact on diverse regulatory systems in mammals. Aspects of the so-called â Westernâ life-style linked to disease risk such as energy dense diet and antibiotic treatment are known to affect the composition and function of the microbiome. Here we review the detailed mechanisms whereby the gut microbiome may modulate risk of diseases linked to sedentary life-style, and ageing related health loss. We focus on the comparative value of natural animal models such as hibernation for studying metabolic regulation, and the challenge of extrapolating from animal models to processes that occur in human ageing. en
dc.description.sponsorship 4D Pharma PLC, United Kingdom (PhD studentship) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.relation.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/joim.13021
dc.rights © 2020, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: O'Toole, P.W. and Shiels, P. G. (2020) 'The role of the microbiota in sedentary life style disorders and ageing: Lessons from the animal kingdom', Journal of Internal Medicine. doi: 10.1111/joim.13021, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.10032. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. en
dc.subject Diet en
dc.subject Sedentary life-style en
dc.subject Gut microbiome en
dc.subject Ageing en
dc.subject Metabolic regulation en
dc.title The role of the microbiota in sedentary life style disorders and ageing: Lessons from the animal kingdom en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul O'Toole, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: pwotoole@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-01-19
dc.date.updated 2020-01-24T12:03:13Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 500176232
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder 4D Pharma en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Internal Medicine en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress pwotoole@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation and copyright statement as necessary. en
dc.identifier.eissn 1365-2796


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