"Against Shameless and Systematic Calumny": Strategies of domination and resistance and their impact on the bodies of the poor in nineteenth-century Ireland

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dc.contributor.author Geber, Jonny
dc.contributor.author O'Donnabhain, Barra
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-13T12:42:45Z
dc.date.available 2020-02-13T12:42:45Z
dc.date.issued 2020-01-14
dc.identifier.citation Geber, J. and O’Donnabhain, B. (2020) '“Against Shameless and Systematic Calumny”: Strategies of Domination and Resistance and Their Impact on the Bodies of the Poor in Nineteenth-Century Ireland', Historical Archaeology, 54(1), pp. 160-183. doi: 10.1007/s41636-019-00219-2 en
dc.identifier.volume 54 en
dc.identifier.startpage 160 en
dc.identifier.endpage 183 en
dc.identifier.issn 0440-9213
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9645
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s41636-019-00219-2 en
dc.description.abstract Mid-Victorian British characterizations of Ireland and much of its population blamed race and “moral character” for the widespread poverty on the island. The Irish poor were portrayed as a “race apart” whose inherent failings were at least partly to blame for the mortality they suffered during the Great Famine of 1845–1852. Recent excavations at Kilkenny workhouse and Spike Island convict prison have produced skeletal assemblages from this critical period. These collections have enabled bioarchaeological analysis of parameters mentioned by the Victorians as indicative of the distinctiveness of the Irish poor: stature, interpersonal violence, and tobacco use. Bioarchaeological data indicate that the differences between Irish and British populations in stature and risk of violence were exaggerated. Such characterizations, we argue, were part of a strategy of “Othering” that served to legitimize colonial domination. This exertion of power did not go uncontested, as the pattern of tobacco use may be indicative of forms of passive resistance. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Springer en
dc.relation.uri https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs41636-019-00219-2
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Bioarchaeology en
dc.subject Colonialism en
dc.subject Identity en
dc.subject Prison en
dc.subject Workhouse en
dc.title "Against Shameless and Systematic Calumny": Strategies of domination and resistance and their impact on the bodies of the poor in nineteenth-century Ireland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Barra O'Donnabhain, Archaeology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: barraod@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2020-02-13T12:36:26Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 501545182
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Historical Archaeology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress barraod@ucc.ie en


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© The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
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