Subaltern learnings: climate resilience and human security in the Caribbean

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dc.contributor.author Jerez Columbié, Yairen
dc.contributor.author Morrissey, John
dc.date.accessioned 2020-12-09T11:28:56Z
dc.date.available 2020-12-09T11:28:56Z
dc.date.issued 2020-11-05
dc.identifier.citation Jerez Columbié, Y. and Morrissey, J. (2020) 'Subaltern learnings: climate resilience and human security in the Caribbean', Territory, Politics, Governance. doi: 10.1080/21622671.2020.1837662 en
dc.identifier.issn 2162-2671
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10823
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/21622671.2020.1837662 en
dc.description.abstract The United Nations' invocation of 'human security' a generation ago promised a world increasingly governed by a 'people-centred' security agenda. In this paper we focus on arguably the most vital global security challenge faced throughout the planet today: climate resilience. We outline how advancing smart climate action and securing climate resilience can be aided by securitization practices that recall the earlier emphases of the United Nations' human security concept. The paper draws upon evidence from the Caribbean as a territory defined dominantly as part of the Global South, yet offering vital knowledge of productive climate security governance that can be instructive to the Global North. The impacts of global warming are particularly evident for the people of small island developing states such as those located in the Caribbean. By analysing the case of Cuba as a country increasingly resilient to extreme weather events, and by interrogating the genealogy of the broader Caribbean's hurricane culture, we show how an effective human security vision for climate justice and resilience can be achieved by recognizing and integrating the valuable forms of locally attuned knowledge that continue to emerge and coalesce in vulnerable geographies. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis Group en
dc.rights © 2020, Regional Studies Association. Published by Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an item published by Taylor & Francis in Territory, Politics, Governance on 5 November 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/21622671.2020.1837662 en
dc.subject Caribbean en
dc.subject Climate justice en
dc.subject Climate resilience en
dc.subject Cuba en
dc.subject Human security en
dc.title Subaltern learnings: climate resilience and human security in the Caribbean en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Yairen Jerez Columbie, ERI, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: yairen.jerez@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 18 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2022-05-05
dc.date.updated 2020-12-09T10:53:28Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 546937838
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Territory, Politics, Governance en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress yairen.jerez@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation as necessary. en
dc.identifier.eissn 2162-268X


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