Age-period-cohort analysis for trends in body mass index in Ireland

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dc.contributor.author Jiang, Tao
dc.contributor.author Gilthorpe, Mark S.
dc.contributor.author Shiely, Frances
dc.contributor.author Harrington, Janas M.
dc.contributor.author Perry, Ivan J.
dc.contributor.author Kelleher, Cecily C.
dc.contributor.author Tu, Yu-Kang
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-08T13:31:31Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-08T13:31:31Z
dc.date.issued 2013-09-25
dc.identifier.citation JIANG, T., GILTHORPE, M. S., SHIELY, F., HARRINGTON, J. M., PERRY, I. J., KELLEHER, C. C. & TU, Y.-K. 2013. Age-period-cohort analysis for trends in body mass index in Ireland. BMC Public Health, 13:889, 1-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-889 en
dc.identifier.volume 13 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 7 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2265
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2458-13-889
dc.description.abstract Background: Obesity is a growing problem worldwide and can often result in a variety of negative health outcomes. In this study we aim to apply partial least squares (PLS) methodology to estimate the separate effects of age, period and cohort on the trends in obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI). Methods: Using PLS we will obtain gender specific linear effects of age, period and cohort on obesity. We also explore and model nonlinear relationships of BMI with age, period and cohort. We analysed the results from 7,796 men and 10,220 women collected through the SLAN (Surveys of Lifestyle, attitudes and Nutrition) in Ireland in the years 1998, 2002 and 2007. Results: PLS analysis revealed a positive period effect over the years. Additionally, men born later tended to have lower BMI (−0.026 kg·m-2 yr-1, 95% CI: -0.030 to −0.024) and older men had in general higher BMI (0.029 kg·m-2 yr-1, 95% CI: 0.026 to 0.033). Similarly for women, those born later had lower BMI (−0.025 kg·m-2 yr-1, 95% CI: -0.029 to −0.022) and older women in general had higher BMI (0.029 kg·m-2 yr-1, 95% CI: 0.025 to 0.033). Nonlinear analyses revealed that BMI has a substantial curvilinear relationship with age, though less so with birth cohort. Conclusion: We notice a generally positive age and period effect but a slightly negative cohort effect. Knowing this, we have a better understanding of the different risk groups which allows for effective public intervention measures to be designed and targeted for these specific population subgroups. en
dc.description.sponsorship Medical Research Council, United Kingdom (PhD Scholarship for Tao Jiang; Grant Number G1000726 for Mark S.Gilthorpe and Yu-Kang Tu) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © Jiang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0 en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject Age-period-cohort en
dc.subject Partial least squares en
dc.subject Locally weighted regression en
dc.subject Self-reported height en
dc.subject Cardiovascular disease en
dc.subject Obesity prevalence en
dc.subject Birth cohort en
dc.subject Health en
dc.subject Adults en
dc.subject Risk en
dc.subject Participants en
dc.title Age-period-cohort analysis for trends in body mass index in Ireland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Ivan Perry, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: i.perry@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Medical Research Council, United Kingdom
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Public Health en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress i.perry@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress f.shiely@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 889


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© Jiang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Jiang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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