A bioengineered nisin derivative to control biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

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dc.contributor.author Field, Des
dc.contributor.author Gaudin, Noemie
dc.contributor.author Lyons, Francy
dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Paula M.
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.contributor.author Hill, Colin
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T10:07:59Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T10:07:59Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Field D, Gaudin N, Lyons F, O'Connor PM, Cotter PD, Hill C, et al. (2015) A Bioengineered Nisin Derivative to Control Biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. PLoS ONE 10(3): e0119684. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0119684
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.issued 3 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2314
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0119684
dc.description.abstract Antibiotic resistance and the shortage of novel antimicrobials are among the biggest challenges facing society. One of the major factors contributing to resistance is the use of frontline clinical antibiotics in veterinary practice. In order to properly manage dwindling antibiotic resources, we must identify antimicrobials that are specifically targeted to veterinary applications. Nisin is a member of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides that exhibit potent antibacterial activity against many gram-positive bacteria, including human and animal pathogens such as Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Listeria, and Clostridium. Although not currently used in human medicine, nisin is already employed commercially as an anti-mastitis product in the veterinary field. Recently we have used bioengineering strategies to enhance the activity of nisin against several high profile targets, including multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and also against staphylococci and streptococci associated with bovine mastitis. However, newly emerging pathogens such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) pose a significant threat in terms of veterinary health and as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance determinants. In this study we created a nisin derivative with enhanced antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. In addition, the novel nisin derivative exhibits an enhanced ability to impair biofilm formation and to reduce the density of established biofilms. The activities of this peptide represent a significant improvement over that of the wild-type nisin peptide and merit further investigation with a view to their use to treat S. pseudintermedius infections. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (Investigator Award 10/IN. 1/B3027); Society for Applied Microbiology, United Kingdom (Students into Work Grant) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 Field et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Antimicrobial cationic peptides en
dc.subject In vitro activities en
dc.subject Methicillin-resistant en
dc.subject Enhanced activity en
dc.subject Aureus biofilms en
dc.subject Lantibiotics en
dc.subject Combination en
dc.subject Cows en
dc.subject Biosynthesis en
dc.subject Bacteriocins en
dc.title A bioengineered nisin derivative to control biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Colin Hill, School of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: c.hill@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000351425400094
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Irish Government
dc.contributor.funder Society for Applied Microbiology, United Kingdom
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.hill@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e0119684


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© 2015 Field et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Field et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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