Testing for biases in selection on avian reproductive traits and partitioning direct and indirect selection using quantitative genetic models

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dc.contributor.author Reed, Thomas E.
dc.contributor.author Gienapp, Phillip
dc.contributor.author Visser, Marcel E.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-14T09:19:23Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-14T09:19:23Z
dc.date.issued 2016-08-24
dc.identifier.citation Reed, T.E., Gienapp, P. and Visser, M.E. (2016) 'Testing for biases in selection on avian reproductive traits and partitioning direct and indirect selection using quantitative genetic models', Evolution. doi:10.1111/evo.13017 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 15 en
dc.identifier.issn 1558-5646
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3080
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/evo.13017
dc.description.abstract Key life history traits such as breeding time and clutch size are frequently both heritable and under directional selection, yet many studies fail to document micro-evolutionary responses. One general explanation is that selection estimates are biased by the omission of correlated traits that have causal effects on fitness, but few valid tests of this exist. Here we show, using a quantitative genetic framework and six decades of life-history data on two free-living populations of great tits Parus major, that selection estimates for egg-laying date and clutch size are relatively unbiased. Predicted responses to selection based on the Robertson-Price Identity were similar to those based on the multivariate breeder’s equation, indicating that unmeasured covarying traits were not missing from the analysis. Changing patterns of phenotypic selection on these traits (for laying date, linked to climate change) therefore reflect changing selection on breeding values, and genetic constraints appear not to limit their independent evolution. Quantitative genetic analysis of correlational data from pedigreed populations can be a valuable complement to experimental approaches to help identify whether apparent associations between traits and fitness are biased by missing traits, and to parse the roles of direct versus indirect selection across a range of environments. en
dc.description.sponsorship Marine Institute (Sea Change Programme: Beaufort Marine Research Award in Fish Population Genetics) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.rights © 2016, the Authors. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Reed, T.E., Gienapp, P. and Visser, M.E. (2016) 'Testing for biases in selection on avian reproductive traits and partitioning direct and indirect selection using quantitative genetic models', Evolution. doi:10.1111/evo.13017, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.13017. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. en
dc.subject Climate change en
dc.subject Fitness en
dc.subject Genetic correlation en
dc.subject Heritability en
dc.subject Microevolution en
dc.subject Phenology en
dc.title Testing for biases in selection on avian reproductive traits and partitioning direct and indirect selection using quantitative genetic models en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Thomas Reed, Zoology and Ecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: treed@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2017-08-24
dc.date.updated 2016-09-12T10:40:56Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 355665617
dc.contributor.funder Marine Institute en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Evolution en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress treed@ucc.ie en


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