Short-term losses and long-term gains: The non-native species Austrominius modestus in Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve

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dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Mary C.
dc.contributor.author Culloty, Sarah C.
dc.contributor.author Davenport, John
dc.contributor.author Harman, Luke
dc.contributor.author Jessopp, Mark J.
dc.contributor.author Kerrigan, Caroline
dc.contributor.author Murray, Colette
dc.contributor.author O'Riordan, Ruth M.
dc.contributor.author McAllen, Rob
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-12T15:00:05Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-12T15:00:05Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04-18
dc.identifier.citation Gallagher, M. C., Culloty, S. C., Davenport, J., Harman, L., Jessopp, M. J., Kerrigan, C., Murray, C., O'Riordan, R. M. and McAllen, R. (2017) 'Short-term losses and long-term gains: The non-native species Austrominius modestus in Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve', Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 191, pp. 96-105. doi: 10.1016/j.ecss.2017.04.020 en
dc.identifier.volume 191 en
dc.identifier.startpage 96 en
dc.identifier.endpage 105 en
dc.identifier.issn 0272-7714
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3959
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.ecss.2017.04.020
dc.description.abstract The non-native barnacle species Austrominius modestus was first recorded in Ireland, close to Lough Hyne marine nature reserve in 1957. This species was not recorded inside the Lough until 1980, but by 2001 was the dominant intertidal barnacle within the reserve. It has been suggested that increases in the abundance of this species at other locations in Europe may be linked to increasing sea surface temperatures, and that A. modestus is an “ecological sleeper”. Despite an overall trend for increasing sea surface temperatures, this long term warming is punctuated by extreme events such as severely cold winters. A. modestus is warm water adapted, and has been recorded to decrease in abundance following cold winters. The winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 were amongst the coldest recorded in Ireland in past decades. In the present study, higher levels of mortality were recorded for A. modestus than native barnacle species in Lough Hyne following these cold winters. Additionally, this species was recorded at lower abundances at the majority of sites surveyed in Lough Hyne in 2011 compared with 2009. Despite this, A. modestus remains the dominant barnacle species in the Lough and monitoring the recruitment of intertidal barnacles within Lough Hyne during 2014e2015 revealed that A. modestus was the most abundant recruit at study sites, both in removal plots and in the pre-existing community. The year-round breeding of A. modestus in addition to the closed nature of the Lough promotes A. modestus within the reserve. Despite this, native barnacle species continue to persist in Lough Hyne, though generally at low abundances, with the exception of exposed locations such as the Rapids and Bullock Island where natives outnumber A. modestus. The future intertidal barnacle community within the Lough is likely to be dominated by A. modestus with Chthamalus montagui and C. stellatus being abundant at sites which are not suitable for A. modestus. While the consequences of this are unknown, it is possible that the presence of A. modestus may alter trophic interactions and energy flow within the reserve. en
dc.description.sponsorship National University of Ireland (Travelling Studentship); University College Cork (Strategic Research Fund) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.rights © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Austrominius modestus en
dc.subject Barnacle en
dc.subject Climate en
dc.subject Invasive en
dc.subject Marine reserve en
dc.subject Long term monitoring en
dc.title Short-term losses and long-term gains: The non-native species Austrominius modestus in Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Sarah Culloty, School Of Bio, Earth & Envir Sc Office, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: s.culloty@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication at the request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-04-18
dc.date.updated 2017-05-12T14:52:01Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 392707851
dc.contributor.funder National University of Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress s.culloty@ucc.ie en


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© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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