Impact of weight loss and sarcopenia on response to chemotherapy, quality of life and survival.

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dc.contributor.author Ryan, Aoife M.
dc.contributor.author Prado, Carla M.
dc.contributor.author Sullivan, Erin S.
dc.contributor.author Power, Derek G.
dc.contributor.author Daly, Louise E.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-02T13:53:45Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-02T13:53:45Z
dc.date.issued 2019-06-28
dc.identifier.citation Ryan, A. M., Prado, C. M., Sullivan, E. S., Power, D. G. and Daly, L. E. (2019) 'Impact of weight loss and sarcopenia on response to chemotherapy, quality of life and survival', Nutrition, In Press, doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2019.06.020 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 27 en
dc.identifier.issn 0899-9007
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8109
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.nut.2019.06.020 en
dc.description.abstract The prevalence of malnutrition in patients with cancer has frequently been shown to be one of the highest of all hospital patient groups. Weight loss is a frequent manifestation of malnutrition in patients with cancer. Several large-scale studies over the last 35 years have reported that involuntary weight loss affects 50-80% of these patients with the degree of weight loss dependent on tumour site, type and stage of disease. This review will focus on the consequences of malnutrition, weight loss and muscle wasting in relation to chemotherapy tolerance, post-operative complications, quality of life and survival in oncology patients. The prognostic impact of weight loss on overall survival has long been recognised with recent data suggesting losses as little as 2.4% predicts survival independent of disease, site, stage or performance score. Recently the use of gold-standard methods of body composition assessment, including computed tomography, have led to an increased understanding of the importance of muscle abnormalities, such as low muscle mass (sarcopenia), and more recently low muscle attenuation, as important prognostic indicators of unfavourable outcomes in patients with cancer. Muscle abnormalities are highly prevalent (ranging from 10-90%, depending on cancer site and the diagnostic criteria used). Both low muscle mass and low muscle attenuation have been associated with poorer tolerance to chemotherapy; increased risk of postoperative complications; significant deterioration in a patients' performance status, and poorer psychological well-being, overall quality of life, and survival. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.uri https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0899900719300930?via%3Dihub
dc.rights © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Sarcopenia en
dc.subject Cachexia en
dc.subject Chemotherapy en
dc.subject Quality of life en
dc.subject Survival en
dc.subject Malnutrition en
dc.subject Wasting en
dc.subject Cancer en
dc.title Impact of weight loss and sarcopenia on response to chemotherapy, quality of life and survival. en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Aoife Ryan, Dept Of Food & Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.ryan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2020-06-28
dc.date.updated 2019-07-02T13:39:06Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 491187255
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Nutrition en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.ryan@ucc.ie en


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© 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license
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