The impact of riluzole on neurobehavioral outcomes in preclinical models of traumatic and nontraumatic spinal cord injury: results from a systematic review of the literature

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dc.contributor.author Tetreault, Lindsay A.
dc.contributor.author Zhu, Mary P.
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Jefferson R.
dc.contributor.author Karadimas, Spyridon K.
dc.contributor.author Fehlings, Michael G.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-20T05:15:36Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-20T05:15:36Z
dc.date.issued 2019-05-12
dc.identifier.citation Tetreault, L.A., Zhu, M.P., Wilson, J.R., Karadimas, S.K. and Fehlings, M.G. (2019) 'The Impact of Riluzole on Neurobehavioral Outcomes in Preclinical Models of Traumatic and Nontraumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Results From a Systematic Review of the Literature'. Global Spine Journal, 2192568219835516. (14pp). DOI:10.1177/2192568219835516 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 14 en
dc.identifier.issn 2192-5682
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9112
dc.identifier.doi 10.1177/2192568219835516 en
dc.description.abstract Study Design:Systematic review.Objective:To evaluate the impact of riluzole on neurobehavioral outcomes in preclinical models of nontraumatic and traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI).Methods:An extensive search of the literature was conducted in Medline, EMBASE, and Medline in Process. Studies were included if they evaluated the impact of riluzole on neurobehavioral outcomes in preclinical models of nontraumatic and traumatic SCI. Extensive data were extracted from relevant studies, including sample characteristics, injury model, outcomes assessed, timing of evaluation, and main results. The SYRCLE checklist was used to assess various sources of bias.Results:The search yielded a total of 3180 unique citations. A total of 16 studies were deemed relevant and were summarized in this review. Sample sizes ranged from 14 to 90, and injury models included traumatic SCI (n = 9), degenerative cervical myelopathy (n = 2), and spinal cord-ischemia (n = 5). The most commonly assessed outcome measures were BBB (Basso, Beattie, Besnahan) locomotor score and von Frey filament testing. In general, rats treated with riluzole exhibited significantly higher BBB locomotor scores than controls. Furthermore, riluzole significantly increased withdrawal thresholds to innocuous stimuli and tail flick latency following application of radiant heat stimuli. Finally, rats treated with riluzole achieved superior results on many components of gait assessment.Conclusion:In preclinical models of traumatic and nontraumatic SCI, riluzole significantly improves locomotor scores, gait function, and neuropathic pain. This review provides the background information necessary to interpret the results of clinical trials on the impact of riluzole in traumatic and nontraumatic SCI. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher SAGE Publications Inc. en
dc.relation.uri https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2192568219835516
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work as published without adaptation or alteration, without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage). en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Riluzole en
dc.subject Spinal cord injury en
dc.subject Review en
dc.subject Degenerative cervical myelopathy en
dc.subject Locomotor scores en
dc.subject Neuropathic pain en
dc.title The impact of riluzole on neurobehavioral outcomes in preclinical models of traumatic and nontraumatic spinal cord injury: results from a systematic review of the literature en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Lindsay Tetreault, College of Medicine and Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Global Spine Journal en
dc.identifier.articleid 2192568219835516 en
dc.identifier.eissn 2192-5690


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© The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work as published without adaptation or alteration, without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work as published without adaptation or alteration, without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
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