Feeding melancholic microbes: MyNewGut recommendations on diet and mood

dc.check.date2019-11-17
dc.check.infoAccess to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher.en
dc.contributor.authorDinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.authorStanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorLong-Smith, Caitriona M.
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Paul
dc.contributor.authorCryan, John F.
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Caitlin S. M.
dc.contributor.authorCenit, María Carmen
dc.contributor.authorvan der Kamp, Jan-Willem
dc.contributor.authorSanz, Yolanda
dc.contributor.funderSeventh Framework Programmeen
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-06T10:20:03Z
dc.date.available2018-12-06T10:20:03Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-17
dc.date.updated2018-12-06T10:07:08Z
dc.description.abstractSummary: Depression is a highly prevalent disorder which exerts a major economic impact in all European countries. The brain-gut-microbiota axis has been described as a new paradigm for advancing understanding and treatment of the disorder. There is now over-whelming evidence to support the fact that gut microbes have a major impact on central neurochemistry and behaviour, especially stress related disorders such as depression. Recent studies indicate that patients with depression have a gut dysbiosis. The reason for this dysbiosis is uncertain. Over recent decades, dietary patterns in Europe and elsewhere have undergone major compositional changes, with increased intakes of red meat, high fat foods, and refined sugars. Individuals who consume a Mediterranean diet have lower rates of depression and a recent study suggests that a Mediterranean diet may have antidepressant properties. Assuming this to be the case, which components of the Mediterranean diet mediate the effects? Highly levels of polyphenols or polyunsaturated fatty acids are obvious candidates. We in the MyNewGut consortium recommend that patients with depression or vulnerability to depression should be encouraged to enhance a plant-based diet with a high content of grains/fibres and fish.en
dc.description.statusPeer revieweden
dc.description.versionAccepted Versionen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.citationDinan, T. G., Stanton, C., Long-Smith, C., Kennedy, P., Cryan, J. F., Cowan, C. S. M., Cenit, M. C., van der Kamp, J.-W. and Sanz, Y. (2018) 'Feeding melancholic microbes: MyNewGut recommendations on diet and mood', Clinical Nutrition. doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2018.11.010en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clnu.2018.11.010
dc.identifier.issn0261-5614
dc.identifier.journaltitleClinical Nutritionen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10468/7177
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.en
dc.relation.projectinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7::SP1::KBBE/613979/EU/Microbiome Influence on Energy balance and Brain Development-Function Put into Action to Tackle Diet-related Diseases and Behavior./MYNEWGUT
dc.rights© 2018, Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectMyNewGuten
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectGut microbiotaen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectDysbiosisen
dc.titleFeeding melancholic microbes: MyNewGut recommendations on diet and mooden
dc.typeArticle (peer-reviewed)en
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Diet_microbes_melancholia_draft_2.pdf
Size:
188.88 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
Accepted Version
License bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
license.txt
Size:
2.71 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description: