Harsh environments minimally invasive optical sensing technique for extreme temperatures: 1000 degrees C and approaching 2500 degrees C

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dc.contributor.author Riza, Nabeel A.
dc.contributor.author Arain, Muzamil A.
dc.contributor.author Perez, Frank
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-27T12:54:10Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-27T12:54:10Z
dc.date.issued 2005-05-23
dc.identifier.citation Riza, N. A., Arain, M. and Perez, F. (2005) 'Harsh environments minimally invasive optical sensing technique for extreme temperatures: 1000 degrees C and approaching 2500 degrees C', Proceeedings of SPIE, 5855, 17th International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors, Bruges, Belgium, 23 May, pp. 687-690. doi: 10.1117/12.623399 en
dc.identifier.volume 5855 en
dc.identifier.startpage 687 en
dc.identifier.endpage 690 en
dc.identifier.issn 0277-786X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10068
dc.identifier.doi 10.1117/12.623399 en
dc.description.abstract To the best of our knowledge, for the first time is designed and demonstrated a single crystal Silicon Carbide (SiC)-based minimally invasive smart optical sensor suited for harsh environments and temperatures reaching 2500 °C. The novel sensor design is based on an agile wavelength source, instantaneous single wavelength interferometry, full optical power cycle data acquisition, free-space targeted laser beam, multiple single crystal thick SiC optical frontend chips, and multi-wavelength signal processing for unambiguous temperature measurements to form a fast and distributed smart optical sensor system. Experiments conducted using a 1550 nm eye safe band tunable laser and a 300 micron coating-free thick SiC chip demonstrate temperature sensing from room temperature to 1000 °C with a measured 1.3 °C resolution. Applications for the proposed sensor include use in fossil fuel-based power systems, aerospace/aircraft systems, satellite systems, deep space exploration systems, and drilling and oil mining industries. en
dc.description.sponsorship U.S. Department of Energy (Grant to Nuonics Inc.) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Society of Photo-optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) en
dc.rights © 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited. en
dc.subject High temperature sensor en
dc.subject Harsh environment en
dc.subject Optical sensor en
dc.subject Silicon Carbide en
dc.subject Sensors en
dc.subject Temperature metrology en
dc.subject Fabry–Perot interferometers en
dc.subject Crystals en
dc.subject Optical sensors en
dc.subject Environmental sensing en
dc.subject Environmental sensing en
dc.title Harsh environments minimally invasive optical sensing technique for extreme temperatures: 1000 degrees C and approaching 2500 degrees C en
dc.type Conference item en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Nabeel Riza, Electrical & Electronic Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: n.riza@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder U.S. Department of Energy en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Proceedings of SPIE en
dc.internal.conferencelocation Bruges, Belgium en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress n.riza@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.eissn 1996-756X


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