Moulting season corticosterone correlates with winter season bodyweight in an Arctic migrant bird

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dc.contributor.author Doyle, Susan
dc.contributor.author Cabot, David
dc.contributor.author Furlong, John
dc.contributor.author Liu, Yixin
dc.contributor.author Colhoun, Kendrew
dc.contributor.author Walsh, Alyn J.
dc.contributor.author McMahon, Barry J.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-19T13:03:22Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-19T13:03:22Z
dc.date.issued 2020-08-11
dc.identifier.citation Doyle, S., Cabot, D., Furlong, J., Liu, Y., Colhoun, K., Walsh, A. J. and McMahon, B. J. (2020) 'Moulting season corticosterone correlates with winter season bodyweight in an Arctic migrant bird', Ibis. doi: 10.1111/ibi.12876 en
dc.identifier.issn 0019-1019
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10665
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/ibi.12876 en
dc.description.abstract In vertebrates, the endocrine system translates environmental changes into physiological responses on which natural selection can act to regulate individual fitness and, ultimately, population dynamics. Corticosterone (CORT) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are important regulators of the avian endocrine system but relatively few studies have investigated their downstream effects on key morphological fitness‐related traits in free‐living populations. This study quantified endocrine–morphology relationships in free‐living Greenland Barnacle Geese Branta leucopsis that breed in the high Arctic. CORT and DHEA were extracted from feather and blood samples and tested for relationships with three morphological traits associated with survival and reproduction: bodyweight, body size and facial plumage coloration. We expected CORT concentration to be higher in birds with less favourable morphological traits (i.e. lighter, smaller and less attractive) and DHEA to be higher in birds with more favourable traits (i.e. heavier, bigger and more attractive). As expected, individuals with higher CORT during the post‐breeding moult (July/August) had significantly lower bodyweight during the following winter (November–April). In contrast, we found no robust DHEA–morphology relationships and no statistically significant relationship between CORT and body size or facial plumage. Overall, this study provides evidence of a negative relationship between CORT and bodyweight extending across different seasons of the annual cycle in a long‐distance migrant. This is of particular interest because bodyweight fluctuates rapidly in response to environmental resources and is closely linked to both survival and reproductive success in this species. Understanding the relationship between CORT and key morphological traits is important because endocrine‐disrupting contaminants in the Arctic increasingly interfere with CORT function in birds, including Barnacle Geese, and based on the results of this study may have consequences for bodyweight regulation. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Grant Number: GOIPG/2016/12) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.rights © 2020, British Ornithologists' Union. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Doyle, S., Cabot, D., Furlong, J., Liu, Y., Colhoun, K., Walsh, A. J. and McMahon, B. J. (2020) 'Moulting season corticosterone correlates with winter season bodyweight in an Arctic migrant bird', Ibis, doi: 10.1111/ibi.12876, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12876. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. en
dc.subject Barnacle Goose en
dc.subject Branta leucopsis en
dc.subject Corticosterone dehydroepiandrosterone en
dc.subject Plumage en
dc.title Moulting season corticosterone correlates with winter season bodyweight in an Arctic migrant bird en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother David Cabot, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. T: +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-08-11
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Ibis en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation and copyright statement as necessary. en
dc.identifier.eissn 1474-919X


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