Metagenomic identification of a novel salt tolerance gene from the human gut microbiome which encodes a membrane protein with homology to a brp/blh-family β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase

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dc.contributor.author Culligan, Eamonn P.
dc.contributor.author Sleator, Roy D.
dc.contributor.author Marchesi, Julian R.
dc.contributor.author Hill, Colin
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:43:39Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:43:39Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Culligan EP, Sleator RD, Marchesi JR, Hill C (2014) Metagenomic Identification of a Novel Salt Tolerance Gene from the Human Gut Microbiome Which Encodes a Membrane Protein with Homology to a brp/blh-Family β-Carotene 15,15′-Monooxygenase. PLoS ONE 9(7): e103318. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103318
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 7 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2331
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0103318
dc.description.abstract The human gut microbiome consists of at least 3 million non-redundant genes, 150 times that of the core human genome. Herein, we report the identification and characterisation of a novel stress tolerance gene from the human gut metagenome. The locus, assigned brpA, encodes a membrane protein with homology to a brp/blh-family β-carotene monooxygenase. Cloning and heterologous expression of brpA in Escherichia coli confers a significant salt tolerance phenotype. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of exogenous β-carotene, cell pellets adopt a red/orange pigmentation indicating the incorporation of carotenoids in the cell membrane. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (SFI Grant 07/CE/B1368); European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Switzerland (Research Fellowship); European Commission (EU FP7 IAPP project ClouDx-i) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 Culligan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Escherichia coli en
dc.subject Listeria monocytogenes en
dc.subject Stress response en
dc.subject Gastrointestinal tract en
dc.subject Staphylococcus aureus en
dc.subject Sequence alignments en
dc.subject Bacterial stress en
dc.subject Oxidative stress en
dc.subject Binding protein en
dc.subject Sigma-Factor en
dc.title Metagenomic identification of a novel salt tolerance gene from the human gut microbiome which encodes a membrane protein with homology to a brp/blh-family β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Colin Hill, School of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: c.hill@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000341354800082
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder APC Microbiome Institute, College of Medicine and Health, University College Cork
dc.contributor.funder Royal Society, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.funder European Commission
dc.contributor.funder European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Switzerland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.hill@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e103318


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© 2015 Culligan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Culligan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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