A psychology of the human brain–gut–microbiome axis

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dc.contributor.author Allen, Andrew P.
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.author Clarke, Gerard
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-05T10:40:29Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-05T10:40:29Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04-18
dc.identifier.citation Allen, A. P., Dinan, T. G., Clarke, G. and Cryan, J. F. (2017) 'A psychology of the human brain–gut–microbiome axis', Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 11(4), e12309. doi:10.1111/spc3.12309 en
dc.identifier.volume 11 en
dc.identifier.issued 4 en
dc.identifier.startpage e12309-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage e12309-22 en
dc.identifier.issn 1751-9004
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3922
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/spc3.12309
dc.description.abstract In recent years, we have seen increasing research within neuroscience and biopsychology on the interactions between the brain, the gastrointestinal tract, the bacteria within the gastrointestinal tract, and the bidirectional relationship between these systems: the brain–gut–microbiome axis. Although research has demonstrated that the gut microbiota can impact upon cognition and a variety of stress-related behaviours, including those relevant to anxiety and depression, we still do not know how this occurs. A deeper understanding of how psychological development as well as social and cultural factors impact upon the brain–gut–microbiome axis will contextualise the role of the axis in humans and inform psychological interventions that improve health within the brain–gut–microbiome axis. Interventions ostensibly aimed at ameliorating disorders in one part of the brain–gut–microbiome axis (e.g., psychotherapy for depression) may nonetheless impact upon other parts of the axis (e.g., microbiome composition and function), and functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome represent a disorder of the axis, rather than an isolated problem either of psychology or of gastrointestinal function. The discipline of psychology needs to be cognisant of these interactions and can help to inform the future research agenda in this emerging field of research. In this review, we outline the role psychology has to play in understanding the brain–gut–microbiome axis, with a focus on human psychology and the use of research in laboratory animals to model human psychology. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (grant number SFI/12/RC/2273); Health Research Board (Health Research Awards (grant number HRA-POR-2-14-647; GC)); Health Service Executive (Healthy Ageing Award (HaPAI/2015/GC)) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Wiley en
dc.rights © 2017 The Authors, Social and Personality Psychology Compass Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Brain-gut-microbiome axis en
dc.subject Stress en
dc.subject Cognition en
dc.subject Mood en
dc.title A psychology of the human brain–gut–microbiome axis en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John F Cryan, Department Of Anatomy & Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-05-05T10:29:02Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 393852827
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Seventh Framework Programme en
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Health Service Executive, Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Social and Personality Psychology Compass en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.cryan@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7::SP1::KBBE/613979/EU/Microbiome Influence on Energy balance and Brain Development-Function Put into Action to Tackle Diet-related Diseases and Behavior./MYNEWGUT en


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© 2017 The Authors, Social and Personality Psychology Compass Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017 The Authors, Social and Personality Psychology Compass Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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