What do women want? Valuing women’s preferences and estimating demand for alternative models of maternity care using a discrete choice experiment

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dc.contributor.author Fawsitt, Christopher G.
dc.contributor.author Bourke, Jane
dc.contributor.author Greene, Richard A.
dc.contributor.author McElroy, Brendan
dc.contributor.author Krucien, Nicolas
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Rosemary
dc.contributor.author Lutomski, Jennifer E.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-08T13:33:42Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-08T13:33:42Z
dc.date.issued 2017-09-23
dc.identifier.citation Fawsitt, C. G., Bourke, J., Greene, R. A., McElroy, B., Krucien, N., Murphy, R. and Lutomski, J. E. (2017) 'What do women want? Valuing women’s preferences and estimating demand for alternative models of maternity care using a discrete choice experiment', Health Policy, 121(11), pp. 1154-1160. doi: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2017.09.013 en
dc.identifier.volume 121
dc.identifier.issued 11
dc.identifier.startpage 1154
dc.identifier.endpage 1160
dc.identifier.issn 0168-8510
dc.identifier.issn 1872-6054
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5136
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.healthpol.2017.09.013
dc.description.abstract In many countries, there has been a considerable shift towards providing a more woman-centred maternity service, which affords greater consumer choice. Maternity service provision in Ireland is set to follow this trend with policymakers committed to improving maternal choice at hospital level. However, women’s preferences for maternity care are unknown, as is the expected demand for new services. In this paper, we used a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to (1) investigate women’s strengths of preference for different features of maternity care; (2) predict market uptake for consultant- and midwifery-led care, and a hybrid model of care called the Domiciliary In and Out of Hospital Care scheme; and (3) calculate the welfare change arising from the provision of these services. Women attending antenatal care across two teaching hospitals in Ireland were invited to participate in the study. Women’s preferred model of care resembled the hybrid model of care, with considerably more women expected to utilise this service than either consultant- or midwifery-led care. The benefit of providing all three services proved considerably greater than the benefit of providing two or fewer services. From a priority setting perspective, pursuing all three models of care would generate a considerable welfare gain, although the cost-effectiveness of such an approach needs to be considered. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health and Safety Executive (National Perinatal Epidemiology Centre of Ireland) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ireland Ltd. en
dc.relation.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851017302415
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Discrete choice experiment en
dc.subject Consultant-led care en
dc.subject Midwifery-led care en
dc.subject Willingness to pay en
dc.title What do women want? Valuing women’s preferences and estimating demand for alternative models of maternity care using a discrete choice experiment en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Christopher G. Fawsitt, National Perinatal Epidemiology Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: c.fawsitt@gmail.com en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health and Safety Executive
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Health Policy en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.fawsitt@gmail.com en


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© 2017, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
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