Can power to methane systems be sustainable and can they improve the carbon intensity of renewable methane when used to upgrade biogas produced from grass and slurry?

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dc.contributor.author Vo, Truc T. Q.
dc.contributor.author Rajendran, Karthik
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Jerry D.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-23T10:42:22Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-23T10:42:22Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07-06
dc.identifier.citation Vo, T. T. Q., Rajendran, K. and Murphy, J. D. (2018) 'Can power to methane systems be sustainable and can they improve the carbon intensity of renewable methane when used to upgrade biogas produced from grass and slurry?', Applied Energy, 228, pp. 1046-1056. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.139 en
dc.identifier.volume 228 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1046 en
dc.identifier.endpage 1056 en
dc.identifier.issn 0306-2619
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/6489
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.139
dc.description.abstract The recast of the renewable energy directive (RED recast) considers power to gas (P2G) an advanced transport biofuel if a 70% greenhouse gas savings as opposed to the fossil fuel displaced is achieved. Power to methane systems can store electricity as gas and the system can be optimised in sourcing CO2 from biogas to upgrade biogas to biomethane. The crucial question in this work is whether P2G systems can be sustainable and if they can improve the sustainability of biomethane systems using traditional upgrading systems. This work evaluates a comparative lifecycle assessment of grass and slurry (50:50 wet weight equivalent to 80:20 volatile solid weight) biomethane using P2G and/or amine scrubbing as an upgrading method. The sustainability of P2G upgrading systems is heavily dependent on the carbon intensity of the source of electricity. Using a 41% decarbonised electricity mix the sustainability was reduced using P2G and would not be deemed sustainable under criterion set by the RED recast. Maintaining a maximum of 2% fugitive CH4 emissions, using 74% slurry (wet weight) in a grass slurry feedstock, allowing for 0.6 t carbon sequestration per hectare per annum in grasslands and using an electricity mix with 85% renewable electricity the whole system including P2G upgrading could satisfy the GHG savings of 70%. However, the traditional system employing amine scrubbing had higher levels of sustainability. en
dc.description.sponsorship Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 2016-RE-DS-6) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd en
dc.rights © 2018, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Life cycle assessment en
dc.subject Sustainability criteria en
dc.subject Advanced biofuels en
dc.subject Power to gas en
dc.subject Biological methanation en
dc.subject Co-digestion en
dc.title Can power to methane systems be sustainable and can they improve the carbon intensity of renewable methane when used to upgrade biogas produced from grass and slurry? en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Karthik Rajendran, Eri, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.rajendran@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2020-07-06
dc.date.updated 2018-07-23T10:21:15Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 446727572
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Environmental Protection Agency en
dc.contributor.funder Ervia, Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Applied Energy en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.rajendran@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres Supplement/12/RC/2302s/IE/Marine Renewable Energy Ireland (MaREI) - EU Grant Manager/ en


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© 2018, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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