Modeling the functional link between movement, feeding activity, and condition in a marine predator

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dc.contributor.author Pirotta, Enrico
dc.contributor.author Schwarz, Lisa K.
dc.contributor.author Costa, Daniel P.
dc.contributor.author Robinson, Patrick W.
dc.contributor.author New, Leslie
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-07T09:11:05Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-07T09:11:05Z
dc.date.issued 2018-12-27
dc.identifier.citation Pirotta, E., Schwarz, L. K., Costa, D. P., Robinson, P. W. and New, L. (2018) 'Modeling the functional link between movement, feeding activity, and condition in a marine predator', Behavioral Ecology, 30(2), pp. 434-445. doi: 10.1093/beheco/ary183 en
dc.identifier.volume 30 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 434 en
dc.identifier.endpage 445 en
dc.identifier.issn 1045-2249
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/7855
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/beheco/ary183 en
dc.description.abstract The ability to quantify animals’ feeding activity and the resulting changes in their body condition as they move in the environment is fundamental to our understanding of a population’s ecology. We use satellite tracking data from northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), paired with simultaneous diving information, to develop a Bayesian state-space model that concurrently estimates an individual’s location, feeding activity, and changes in condition. The model identifies important foraging areas and times, the relative amount of feeding occurring therein, and thus the different behavioral strategies in which the seals engage. The fitness implications of these strategies can be assessed by looking at the resulting variation in individuals’ condition, which in turn affects the condition and survival of their offspring. Therefore, our results shed light on the processes affecting an individual’s decision-making as it moves and feeds in the environment. In addition, we demonstrate how the model can be used to simulate realistic patterns of disturbance at different stages of the trip, and how the predicted accumulation of lipid reserves varies as a consequence. Particularly, disturbing an animal in periods of high feeding activity or shortly after leaving the colony was predicted to have the potential to lead to starvation. In contrast, an individual could compensate even for very severe disturbance if such disturbance occurred outside the main foraging grounds. Our modeling approach is applicable to marine mammal species that perform drift dives and can be extended to other species where an individual’s buoyancy can be inferred from its diving behavior. en
dc.description.sponsorship Office of Naval Research (N00014-00-1-0880; N00014-03-1-0651; N00014-08-1-1195; N00014-10-1-0356 and N00014-02-1-1012); International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (E & P Sound and Marine Life Joint Industry Project No. JIP 22 07-23); Alfred P. Sloan Foundation,Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation (Tagging of Pacific Predators Program) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary183
dc.rights © 2019, Oxford University Press. This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Behavioral Ecology following peer review. The version of record [Pirotta, E., Schwarz, L. K., Costa, D. P., Robinson, P. W. and New, L. (2018) 'Modeling the functional link between movement, feeding activity, and condition in a marine predator', Behavioral Ecology, 30(2), pp. 434-445. doi: 10.1093/beheco/ary183] is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary183 en
dc.subject Body condition en
dc.subject Disturbance en
dc.subject Drift dives en
dc.subject Elephant seals en
dc.subject Feeding ecology en
dc.subject Satellite tracking en
dc.subject Bayesian state-space modelling en
dc.title Modeling the functional link between movement, feeding activity, and condition in a marine predator en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Enrico Pirotta, School Of Bio, Earth & Envir Sc Office, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2019-12-27
dc.date.updated 2019-05-03T11:53:51Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 483843880
dc.contributor.funder Office of Naval Research en
dc.contributor.funder International Association of Oil and Gas Producers en
dc.contributor.funder Alfred P. Sloan Foundation en
dc.contributor.funder Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation en
dc.contributor.funder David and Lucile Packard Foundation en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Behavioral Ecology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.placepublication Oxford en
dc.identifier.eissn 1465-7279


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