Beneficial bile acid metabolism from Lactobacillus plantarum of food origin

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dc.contributor.author Prete, Roberta
dc.contributor.author Long, Sarah Louise
dc.contributor.author Lopez Gallardo, Alvaro
dc.contributor.author Gahan, Cormac G.
dc.contributor.author Corsetti, Aldo
dc.contributor.author Joyce, Susan A.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-08T08:55:36Z
dc.date.available 2020-04-08T08:55:36Z
dc.date.issued 2020-12-24
dc.identifier.citation Prete, R., Long, S.L., Gallardo, A.L., Gahan, C. G., Corsetti, A. and Joyce, S. A. (2020) ‘Beneficial bile acid metabolism from Lactobacillus plantarum of food origin’, Scientific Reports, 10, 1165 (11 pp). doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-58069-5 en
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 11 en
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9817
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-020-58069-5 en
dc.description.abstract Bile acid (BA) signatures are altered in many disease states. BA metabolism is an important microbial function to assist gut colonization and persistence, as well as microbial survival during gastro intestinal (GI) transit and it is an important criteria for potential probiotic bacteria. Microbes that express bile salt hydrolase (BSH), gateway BA modifying enzymes, are considered to have an advantage in the gut. This property is reported as selectively limited to gut-associated microbes. Food-associated microbes have the potential to confer health benefits to the human consumer. Here, we report that food associated Lactobacillus plantarum strains are capable of BA metabolism, they can withstand BA associated stress and propagate, a recognised important characteristic for GIT survival. Furthermore, we report that these food associated Lactobacillus plantarum strains have the selective ability to alter BA signatures in favour of receptor activation that would be beneficial to humans. Indeed, all of the strains examined showed a clear preference to alter human glycol-conjugated BAs, although clear strain-dependent modifications were also evident. This study demonstrates that BA metabolism by food-borne non-pathogenic bacteria is beneficial to both microbe and man and it identifies an evolutionary-conserved characteristic, previously considered unique to gut residents, among food-associated non-pathogenic isolates. en
dc.description.sponsorship Ministero dell’Istruzione, dell’Università e della Ricerca (Italian Ministry of University and Research (PRIN Project WZ2NJN_005, University of Teramo Unit)); Science Foundation Ireland/ European Commission (SFI-EU JPI CABALA (Grant Number 16/ERA-HDHL/3358)); en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Springer Nature en
dc.relation.uri https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-58069-5
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.subject Bile acid (BA) signatures en
dc.subject Microbes en
dc.subject Gut en
dc.subject Microbial function en
dc.title Beneficial bile acid metabolism from Lactobacillus plantarum of food origin en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Susan Joyce, School Of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: s.joyce@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2020-04-06T16:48:58Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 501177831
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Ministero dell’Istruzione, dell’Università e della Ricerca en
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Scientific Reports en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress s.joyce@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 1165 en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/ en


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© The Author(s) 2020. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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