Microbial regulation of microRNA expression in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex

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dc.contributor.author Hoban, Alan E.
dc.contributor.author Stilling, Roman M.
dc.contributor.author Moloney, Gerard M.
dc.contributor.author Moloney, Rachel D.
dc.contributor.author Shanahan, Fergus
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.contributor.author Clarke, Gerard
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-26T11:39:23Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-26T11:39:23Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Hoban, A. E., Stilling, R. M., M. Moloney, G., Moloney, R. D., Shanahan, F., Dinan, T. G., Cryan, J. F. and Clarke, G. (2017) 'Microbial regulation of microRNA expression in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex', Microbiome, 5(1), 102 (11pp). doi: 10.1186/s40168-017-0321-3 en
dc.identifier.volume 5
dc.identifier.issn 2049-2618
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/4808
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s40168-017-0321-3
dc.description.abstract Background: There is growing evidence for a role of the gut microbiome in shaping behaviour relevant to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. Preclinical studies using germ-free (GF) animals have been essential in contributing to our current understanding of the potential importance of the host microbiome for neurodevelopment and behaviour. In particular, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that manipulation of the gut microbiome modulates anxiety-like behaviours. The neural circuits that underlie anxiety-and fear-related behaviours are complex and heavily depend on functional communication between the amygdala and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Previously, we have shown that the transcriptional networks within the amygdala and PFC of GF mice are altered. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act through translational repression to control gene translation and have also been implicated in anxiety-like behaviours. However, it is unknown whether these features of host post-transcriptional machinery are also recruited by the gut microbiome to exert control over CNS transcriptional networks. Results: We conducted Illumina (R) next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the amygdala and PFC of conventional, GF and germ-free colonized mice (exGF). We found a large proportion of miRNAs to be dysregulated in GF animals in both brain regions (103 in the amygdala and 31 in the PFC). Additionally, colonization of GF mice normalized some of the noted alterations. Next, we used a complementary approach to GF by manipulating the adult rat microbiome with an antibiotic cocktail to deplete the gut microbiota and found that this strategy also impacted the expression of relevant miRNAs. Conclusion: These results suggest that the microbiome is necessary for appropriate regulation of miRNA expression in brain regions implicated in anxiety-like behaviours. en
dc.description.sponsorship Brian and Behaviour Research Foundation (NARSAD Young Investigator Grant (20771, HRB: HRA_POR/2012/32); Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) (SFI/12/RC/2273); Irish Research Council (Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship (GOIPD/2014/355) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central Ltd en
dc.relation.uri https://microbiomejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40168-017-0321-3
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject Amygdala en
dc.subject Prefrontal cortex en
dc.subject Microbiome gut brain axis en
dc.subject MicroRNAs en
dc.subject Germ free en
dc.subject Antibiotics en
dc.subject miR-206-3p en
dc.subject Gut brain axis en
dc.subject Neurotrophic factor en
dc.subject Gene expression en
dc.subject Neural circuits en
dc.subject Behavior en
dc.subject Mice en
dc.subject Anxiety en
dc.subject Stress en
dc.subject Model en
dc.subject Rat en
dc.title Microbial regulation of microRNA expression in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Gerard Clarke, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. E-mail: g.clarke@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000408458800001
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine
dc.contributor.funder Mead Johnson Nutrition
dc.contributor.funder Cremo
dc.contributor.funder Suntory Foundation
dc.contributor.funder Nutricia Research Foundation
dc.contributor.funder 4D Pharma
dc.contributor.funder Brain and Behavior Research Foundation
dc.contributor.funder Enterprise Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Microbiome en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.clarke@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 102
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2273/IE/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC) - Interfacing Food & Medicine/


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© 2017, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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