Do changing levels of maternal exercise during pregnancy affect neonatal adiposity? Secondary analysis of the babies after SCOPE: evaluating the longitudinal impact using neurological and nutritional endpoints (BASELINE) birth cohort (Cork, Ireland)

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dc.contributor.author Norris, Tom
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Fergus P.
dc.contributor.author Khashan, Ali S.
dc.contributor.author Murray, Deirdre M.
dc.contributor.author Kiely, Mairead E.
dc.contributor.author Hourihane, Jonathan O'B.
dc.contributor.author Baker, Philip N.
dc.contributor.author Kenny, Louise C.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-06T13:36:30Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-06T13:36:30Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Norris, T., McCarthy, F. P., Khashan, A. S., Murray, D. M., Kiely, M., Hourihane, J. O. B., Baker, P. N. and Kenny, L. C. (2017) 'Do changing levels of maternal exercise during pregnancy affect neonatal adiposity? Secondary analysis of the babies after SCOPE: evaluating the longitudinal impact using neurological and nutritional endpoints (BASELINE) birth cohort (Cork, Ireland)', BMJ Open, 7(11), e017987 (100pp). doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017987 en
dc.identifier.volume 7
dc.identifier.issued 11
dc.identifier.startpage 1
dc.identifier.endpage 10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/5407
dc.identifier.doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017987
dc.description.abstract Abstract: Objective To investigate whether changing levels of exercise during pregnancy are related to altered neonatal adiposity. Design: Secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study. Setting: Cork, Ireland. Participants: 1200 mother–infant pairs recruited as part of a prospective birth cohort, Babies After SCOPE: Evaluating the Longitudinal Impact Using Neurological and Nutritional Endpoints (BASELINE). Main outcome measures: Neonatal adiposity was assessed within several days of birth using air displacement plethysmography (PEAPOD). Per cent body fat (BF%) as a continuous outcome and a pair of dichotomous variables; high or low adiposity, representing BF% >90th or <10th centile, respectively. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between exercise and the respective outcomes. Results: Crude analysis revealed no association between a changing level of exercise (since becoming pregnant) at 15 weeks’ gestation and any of the outcomes (BF%, low adiposity and high adiposity). At 20 weeks’ gestation, analyses revealed that relative to women who do not change their exercise level up to 20 weeks, those women who decreased their exercise level were more likely to give birth to a neonate with adiposity above the 90th centile (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.46). This association was maintained after adjustment for putative confounders (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.47). Conclusions: We observed a possible critical period for the association between changing exercise levels and neonatal adiposity, with no association observed with exercise recall for the first 15 weeks of gestation, but an association with a decreasing level of exercise between 15 and 20 weeks. These results should be interpreted in line with the limitations of the study and further studies utilising objectively measured estimates of exercise are required in order to replicate these findings. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board(CSA 2007/2); Food Standards Agency (TO7060) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BMJ Publishing Group en
dc.relation.uri http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/11/e017987
dc.rights © 2017, the Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subject Neonatal adiposity en
dc.subject BASELINE en
dc.subject Pregnancy en
dc.title Do changing levels of maternal exercise during pregnancy affect neonatal adiposity? Secondary analysis of the babies after SCOPE: evaluating the longitudinal impact using neurological and nutritional endpoints (BASELINE) birth cohort (Cork, Ireland) en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother a.khashan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Food Standards Agency
dc.contributor.funder National Children’s Research Centre, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMJ Open en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress Ali S. Khashan,Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.khashan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress fergus.mccarthy@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e017987
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/SFI/SFI Research Centres/12/RC/2272/IE/Irish Centre for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research (INFANT)/


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© 2017, the Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017, the Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial
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