Epigenetic silencing by early life hypoxic stress programmes respiratory motor control

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dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Karen M.
dc.contributor.author Dias, Maria L.
dc.contributor.author McDonald, Fiona B.
dc.contributor.author O'Halloran, Ken D.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-10T12:35:34Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-10T12:35:34Z
dc.date.issued 2019-11-04
dc.identifier.citation O'Connor, K. M., Dias, M. L., McDonald, F. and O'Halloran, K. D. (2019) 'Epigenetic silencing by early life hypoxic stress programmes respiratory motor control', Experimental Physiology, 105(1), pp. 3-4. doi: 10.1113/EP088244 en
dc.identifier.volume 105 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 3 en
dc.identifier.endpage 4 en
dc.identifier.issn 0958-0670
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9485
dc.identifier.doi 10.1113/EP088244 en
dc.description.abstract Preterm birth is a risk factor for the development of cardiorespiratory complications. Infants that are born prematurely face myriad challenges due to physiological immaturity. Respiratory control impairments in early life including apnoea of prematurity with resultant disruption to systemic oxygen status can provoke long-term disability, including increased propensity to develop morbidities in later life such as sleep-disordered breathing. In rodents, exposure to intermittent hypoxia mimicking recurrent episodes of oxygen desaturation that are characteristic of apnoeas, provokes plasticity at multiple sites of the respiratory control network culminating in breathing instabilities, altered chemoreflex control of breathing and impaired respiratory motor nerve and muscle function. Persistent effects of stressors presenting during critical periods of early development may be sustained by epigenetic mechanisms. Such changes may be especially relevant to perinatal exposure to intermittent hypoxia since it is established that hypermethylation of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes underlies carotid body chemoreceptor sensitization and respiratory instability following exposure to intermittent hypoxia during postnatal development. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.relation.uri https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1113/EP088244
dc.rights © 2019, the Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2019, The Physiological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: O'Connor, K. M., Dias, M. L., McDonald, F. and O'Halloran, K. D. (2019) 'Epigenetic silencing by early life hypoxic stress programmes respiratory motor control', Experimental Physiology, 105(1), pp. 3-4, doi: 10.1113/EP088244. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. en
dc.subject Preterm birth en
dc.subject Physiological immaturity en
dc.subject Cardiorespiratory complications en
dc.subject Apnoea of prematurity en
dc.subject Sleep-disordered breathing en
dc.subject Intermittent hypoxia en
dc.subject Respiratory instability en
dc.subject Postnatal en
dc.subject DNA methylation en
dc.subject Hypoxic stress en
dc.subject Cardiorespiratory control en
dc.title Epigenetic silencing by early life hypoxic stress programmes respiratory motor control en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Ken O'Halloran, Physiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.ohalloran@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2020-11-04
dc.date.updated 2019-11-14T09:54:03Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 499910273
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Experimental Physiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.ohalloran@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.eissn 1469-445X


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